Dismantling White Supremacy

Culture reflects a set of agreed-upon expectations and norms in a social community. Culture includes values, beliefs, perceptions, and behaviors learned from one’s group. In the United States, white supremacy culture pervades the communities and organizations that we all inhabit. In this interactive session, we will discuss a brief article (required as pre-reading before the workshop) written by anti-racism scholars and activists on white supremacy culture. We will identify ways that we can dismantle white supremacy culture in our own communities.
Learning objectives:

Gain deeper understanding of how white supremacy culture permeates departments and universities.
Recognize how white supremacy shows up in our own spaces (our department or program, our university, our professional organizations, etc.)
Identify action steps we will take to dismantle white supremacy culture in our own contexts

This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/Yy5jY.
We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Registration Link

You Don’t Belong Here: The Stories our Systems Tell (and Why We Have to Disrupt Them)

Many universities message extensively around their commitments about diversity, equity, and inclusion. These institutional assertions are often called into question, though, by the stories of members of the higher education community who continue to face marginalization and othering within their professional and educational spaces. This session centers around an embodied case study depicting one woman’s reflections on her experiences of higher education and her interactions with a range of systems that sent a persistent message that she didn’t belong, that she would never truly be a part of her university community. Through session activities, participants will consider how these messages manifest and why they continue to occur despite the extensive labor of individuals sincerely committed to advancing equity.
Learning objectives:

Encourage participants to reflect upon and analyze messaging around DEI at universities.
Reflect on the nuances of university messaging that creates a sense of exclusion in underrepresented students.
Participants will consider how these messages manifest and why they continue to occur despite the extensive labor of individuals sincerely committed to advancing equity.

The theatrical portion of this session contains strong language. It includes explicit descriptions of racist and classist behaviors and the impact of systemic inequities on individuals and communities.

This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/2D2eA.

We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Anti-Racism in an Abroad Context

Structural racism in the United States is the normalization and legitimization of an array of dynamics—historical, cultural, institutional, and interpersonal—that routinely advantage whites while producing cumulative and chronic adverse outcomes for people of color. It is a system of hierarchy and inequity, primarily characterized by white supremacy—the preferential treatment, privilege, and power for white people at the expense of other racially oppressed people. It is also important to recognize that racism is a global issue and continues to be perpetuated in society across the globe and it manifests in many different ways at various levels. This anti-racism workshop in an abroad context aims to offer an entryway for the student to engage in observing how racism plays out in different societies outside the United States, utilizing examples, particularly media representation, that may reflect deeper messages, and what it means to be anti-racist in the abroad context for American students who have been abroad, or may be visiting, studying, or traveling abroad.
This workshop will engage participants in the following activities:

Having a better understanding of the phrase “anti-racism”
Learning about race and its nuances
Recognizing how culture can shape how racism and power structures develop
Seeing how media around the world uphold oppression in different ways, and
Creating action steps toward actively recognizing oppression abroad.

This workshop is part of the Rackham North Workshop Series although graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from all campuses are welcome to attend.
This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/Bo898.
We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Registration link

Anti-Racist Community Engagement

This interactive virtual workshop will interrogate the role white supremacy often plays in university community engagement experiences and will explore anti-racist approaches to our work in and with communities. The workshop is designed for students with prior knowledge or experience with community engagement who are interested in learning more about how to practice anti-racism in their engaged course, service, project, or research. Workshop content will build on basic concepts of race, racism, social identity, power, and privilege. If you’re newer to those concepts and how they connect to community engagement, we encourage you to complete modules 1 and 2 of the Community Engagement: Collaborating for Change MOOC and/or attend our Entering, Engaging, and Exiting Communities workshop (see upcoming sessions) before signing up for this offering. You may also want to read Tania Mitchell’s (2008) “Traditional vs. Critical Service-Learning” before attending.

Understand how white supremacy shows up in community engagement at both systemic and interpersonal levels.
Develop a critical lens to recognize and address three common symptoms of white supremacy in community engagement.
Understand the challenges of addressing white supremacy in university-community partnerships in the short and long term.
Practice applying anti-racist strategies to address common partnership scenarios.

This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/xmqgE.
We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Registration link

Workshop: Anti-Racist Community Engagement (Students Only)

This interactive virtual workshop will interrogate the role white supremacy often plays in university community engagement experiences and will explore anti-racist approaches to our work in and with communities. The workshop is designed for students with prior knowledge or experience with community engagement who are interested in learning more about how to practice anti-racism in their engaged course, service, project, or research.

Workshop content will build on basic concepts of race, racism, social identity, power, and privilege. If you’re newer to those concepts and how they connect to community engagement, we encourage you to complete modules 1 and 2 of the Community Engagement: Collaborating for Change MOOC and/or attend our Entering, Engaging, and Exiting Communities workshop (see upcoming sessions on our homepage) before signing up for this offering. You may also want to read Tania Mitchell’s (2008) “Traditional vs. Critical Service-Learning” before attending.

Registration link

Anti-Racism Teach-In

Racial justice begins with anti-racism. Anti-racism is the active process of identifying and eliminating racism by changing systems, organizational structures, policies, practices, and attitudes so that power is redistributed and shared equitably. This 90 minutes Anti-Racism Teach-in/Workshop will engage analytical frameworks for examining systemic cultural, social, economic, and political forces in the community along with individual reflection. Our hope is to raise critical consciousness, understand the opportunity for actions, and how our resources can be distributed.

DEI Strategic Plan Community Recognition Festival

Gather with the campus community to recognize the many accomplishments of U-M’s five-year DEI Strategic Plan implementation. This will be an open-house style event that will include student performances, various speakers, refreshments and activities to engage students, staff and faculty. Stop by for a few minutes or stay longer! Come on your own or bring your friends and colleagues!

Anti-Racism Research and Scholarship for Action

Research and scholarship have long informed efforts to dismantle systemic racism. The racial reckoning sparked during 2020 was historic in the widespread acknowledgement of pervasive structural racism and resulting disparate inequities and injustices impacting minoritized communities and communities of color in the US. Institutions across the nation have expressed commitments to address racism in their organizations. The question now is how to move from intention to action and how to enact structural change that is transformational and sustainable.

In this session, we draw on the collective expertise and experience of University of Michigan scholars who have dedicated their careers to applying their scholarship to advance anti-racism and facilitate systemic change. Join us for an interdisciplinary conversation as we discuss how research and practice efforts around anti-racism are manifested in their respective fields, what it means to conduct research on race and racism in the current socio-political context, and the lessons these scholars have learned about engaging anti-racism in the academy.

This event is hosted by National Center for Institutional Diversity’s Anti-Racism Collaborative, a strategic space that engages the University of Michigan community around research and scholarship focused on racial inequality, racial justice, and anti-racist praxis.

Registration link

Entering, Engaging, and Exiting Communities—An Introduction for Graduate Students

Learning In Community, The Ginsberg CenterThis interactive workshop introduces principles and practices for thoughtfully engaging with communities, including motivations, impact of social identities, and strategies for engaging in reciprocal, ethical, and respectful ways.
Understand and articulate best practices for preparing to enter communities, engaging with communities, and exiting communities in positive, humanizing, and sustainable ways.

Reflect on how social identities, power, and privilege impact community engagement work.
Develop skills for communicating effectively with diverse partners and stakeholders and building a positive rapport in order to advance shared goals.
Practice applying principles of equitable community engagement to address common partnership scenarios.

This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/bvAn8.

We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

DEI Research & Teaching Awards

We’re excited to recognize the winners of our Inaugural DEI Research & Teaching Awards. These awards, instituted in 2021, celebrate and honor research related to diversity, equity and inclusion conducted at the Ross School of Business, at every stage of the academic journey. Also established in 2021, the annual J. Frank Yates Diversity and Inclusion Teaching Excellence Award, honors a member of our teaching faculty who demonstrates a commitment to diversity and inclusion and makes a significant positive impact on the learning and personal growth of our students.

Each award winner, in addition to being recognized for their contributions to diversity, equity and inclusion, will present a short TEDx-style lightning talk.  

We hope you’ll join us in honoring our award winners. For those unable to attend, a recording will be made available post-event.

RSVP Here