Roundtable and Q&A with Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini Sloan

Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini SloanPlease join us in the Hopwood Room for a discussion between essayists Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini Sloan. This lunchtime event will be catered; food will be available at 11:30, and the discussion will start at noon.

Hilton Als began contributing to The New Yorker in 1989, writing pieces for ‘The Talk of the Town,’ he became a staff writer in 1994, theatre critic in 2002, and lead theater critic in 2012. Week after week, he brings to the magazine a rigorous, sharp, and lyrical perspective on acting, playwriting, and directing. With his deep knowledge of the history of performance—not only in theatre but in dance, music, and visual art—he shows us how to view a production and how to place its director, its author, and its performers in the ongoing continuum of dramatic art. His reviews are not simply reviews; they are provocative contributions to the discourse on theatre, race, class, sexuality, and identity in America. Als is an associate professor of writing at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and has taught at Yale University, Wesleyan, and Smith College. He lives in New York City.

Aisha Sabatini Sloan was born and raised in Los Angeles. Her writing about race and current events is often coupled with analysis of art, film and pop culture. She studied English Literature at Carleton College and went on to earn an MA in Cultural Studies and Studio Art from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the University of Arizona. Her essay collection, The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White was published by the University of Iowa Press in 2013. Her most recent essay collection, Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, was just chosen by Maggie Nelson as the winner of the 1913 Open Prose Contest and will be published in 2017. She is currently a Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

CSAS Lecture Series | Film’s Mise-en-Scène as Labor’s Social Space

Priya Jaikumar, Associate Professor, Division of Cinema and Media Studies, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California

Priya Jaikumar, Associate Professor, Division of Cinema and Media Studies, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern CaliforniaCinema’s heterogeneous artifactual status—as a regulated and profit-making commodity, technological apparatus, representational medium and employment opportunity—links the changing look of contemporary Hindi cinema’s mise-en-scène to the current commodification of land and leisure, the technologization of environment, and the shifting social range of Bollywood’s workers in globalizing India. Conceiving of filmed space as a tensile relationship between a film’s onscreen space and its defining social spaces, which together constitute a film’s visual appearance and its institutional materiality, I look at the ways in which Bollywood’s backgrounds register India’s politico-economic transitions. The composition and appearance of a film’s backgrounds encode socio-economic histories of India’s transition from an era of economic protectionism to the current phase of privatization and the commodification of everyday life. Based on my interviews with professionals who work on producing Hindi cinema’s locations and backgrounds, conducted in the months leading up to the national elections that put Narendra Modi in power in 2014, this talk proposes a spatial film historiography to account for the complex spatialities of a media form and society, when both are in transition.

Priya Jaikumar is Associate Professor at the Division of Cinema and Media Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California. Her talk will draw on her forthcoming book, Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space, in production with Duke University Press.

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange. Email us at csas@umich.edu.

Power of Language

Power of Language flyerJoin LingoMatch for a night of art and presentations centered around the language experiences of people of color (POC). The event delves into how language barriers create challenges in POC communities and how these challenges are perceived, understood and interacted with by different language communities. We will display art created by local and student artists of color. In addition to discussing language barriers, the event will give artists an opportunity to discuss how language enriches their life, informs their artwork, as well as how it challenges the individual and community, especially regarding identity, bias, and prejudice. Captioning and English ASL interpretation will be present at the event. Food will be provided!

African Women Film Series – Notre Étrangère (The Place in Between) Film Screening

Film series flyerThe University of Michigan’s CEW+, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, and African Studies Center are pleased to present the 2018-2019 African Women Film Series. These exciting films celebrate women’s voices through rich, dynamic, and intimate visual portrayals.

All films will screen in the Michigan Theater Screening Room at 603 E. Liberty St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104.

Register here.

The Age of the Internet in Comic Books: Book Club Tour

On the occasion of the exhibition Art in the Age of the Internet, UMMA and Vault of Midnight-Ann Arbor have partnered up to form the UMMA Book Club: The Age of the Internet in Comic Books. Join David Choberka, Andrew W. Mellon Manager of Academic Outreach & Teaching, for a discussion in the gallery that connects the art on view to  themes in the selected comics. Open to anyone, regardless of participation in the book club.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors:
Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors:
William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga  

University of Michigan Funding Partners:
School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

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Critical Visualities 3

2019 Conference of the Visual Culture Workshop

The Visual Culture Workshop (VCW) convenes the third annual Critical Visualities Conference in order to ask the timely questions: “What are the political dimensions of the affective charge between art and its audience? Between the critic and the art she engages? How does it feel to look ‘critically’ now?” 

Now in its third year, Critical Visualities has grown into a major national conference, drawing top faculty from across the country in the fields of American studies, African American studies, visual culture studies, performance studies, media studies, and literary studies. Designed to offer the University of Michigan community an unparalleled opportunity to engage with these scholars in an unusually intimate setting, Critical Visualities incites new insights, new questions, and new collaborations for presenters and audience members alike.

As always, Critical Visualities is particularly attune to the ways in which our interdisciplinary work enables us to engage with current events marked by feelings of shock and urgency about ongoing racial injustice and gendered violence.

Speakers include: Sarah Bay-Cheng (Bowdoin); Kimberly Juanita Brown (Mt. Holyoke); Zahid Chaudhry (Princeton); Laurie Gries (University of Colorado); Nicole Fleetwood (Rutgers); and UM’s Sara Blair (English), Vera Grant (Deputy Director, Curatorial Affairs, UMMA), Joan Kee (History of Art), and Lisa Nakamura (American Culture).


Thursday, March 28 [All events in Angell 3222] 10am: Welcoming Remarks
10:15am-12:15pm: Faculty Panel 1 
1:30pm-3:30pm: Faculty Panel 2
3:45-5:15pm: Graduate Student Roundtable

UMMA Book Club: Art, Ideas, & Politics

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s. Surrounded by the large-scale artworks by Sam Gilliam, Helen Frankenthaler, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power (Jan 10), Art on My Mind, Visual Politics by bell hooks (March 14), Ninth Street Women by Mary Gabriel (May 9), Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner (July 11), and How We Get Free, edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12). Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Wandering Song, an anthology of the Central American diaspora.

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Exhibition Endowment Donors:  Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund

University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

 

Critical Visualities 3

2019 Conference of the Visual Culture Workshop

The Visual Culture Workshop (VCW) convenes the third annual Critical Visualities Conference in order to ask the timely questions: “What are the political dimensions of the affective charge between art and its audience? Between the critic and the art she engages? How does it feel to look ‘critically’ now?” 

Now in its third year, Critical Visualities has grown into a major national conference, drawing top faculty from across the country in the fields of American studies, African American studies, visual culture studies, performance studies, media studies, and literary studies. Designed to offer the University of Michigan community an unparalleled opportunity to engage with these scholars in an unusually intimate setting, Critical Visualities incites new insights, new questions, and new collaborations for presenters and audience members alike.

As always, Critical Visualities is particularly attune to the ways in which our interdisciplinary work enables us to engage with current events marked by feelings of shock and urgency about ongoing racial injustice and gendered violence.

Speakers include: Sarah Bay-Cheng (Bowdoin); Kimberly Juanita Brown (Mt. Holyoke); Zahid Chaudhry (Princeton); Laurie Gries (University of Colorado); Nicole Fleetwood (Rutgers); and UM’s Sara Blair (English), Vera Grant (Deputy Director, Curatorial Affairs, UMMA), Joan Kee (History of Art), and Lisa Nakamura (American Culture).


Friday, March 29 [All events in Angell 3222] 9:30am-11:30am: Faculty Panel 3
11:30am-12:00pm: Coffee and snack break
12:00pm-1:45pm: Community reflection: Where next?

UMMA Book Club: The Age of the Internet in Comic Books

In conjunction with the exhibition Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today, UMMA and Vault of Midnight-Ann Arbor partner to present a book club that will read and discuss three comic books that explore some of the extreme possibilities of life in the age of the internet. Books include: The Private Eye (January 20), Snot Girl vol. 1 (February 17), and Bitch Planet vol 1 (March 10). Pick and choose your favorites or come to the whole series. Books will be available for sale at Vault of Midnight. All are invited to read and participate. Please note that these comic books deal with mature material.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors:
Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors:
William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga  

University of Michigan Funding Partners:
School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

umma.umich.edu

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