A/PIA Seminar: Gordon H Chang

Gordon H. Chang (Professor of American History, Stanford University)

Bio:
I am interested in two areas of American life that are often considered separately. The historical connections between race and ethnicity in America, on the one hand, and foreign relations, on the other are in fact profound. I explore these interconnections in my teaching and scholarship. My particular area of focus is trans-Pacific relations, the inter-connections between East Asia and America.I am interested in political, social, and cultural interactions from the earliest days of America to the present.My current research project concerns the recovery and interpretation of the experiences of Chinese railroad workers in North America. Please go to www.chineserailroadworkers.stanford.edu for more information.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Long Table Discussion: Art / Environment / Sustainability

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a three-day residency, June 27–30. Mattingly, whose photograph, Life of Objects, is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. The centerpiece of the residency is a large-scale public art project titled Objects in the Round, in the Annex tent at Top of the Park on Ingalls Mall where festivalgoers will build a miniature landscape with Mattingly that explores relationships with objects, built landscapes, and habits of consumption.   To kick off her residency, Mattingly will be joined by thought leaders from U-M and beyond—A2SF’s James Carter, UMMA curator Jennifer Friess, arts curator of the U-M Institute for the Humanities Amanda Krugliak, director of the Huron River Watershed Council Laura Rubin, Detroit-based interdisciplinary artist Sacramento Knoxx, independent film director and producer Diane Cheklich, and Christy Bieber, co-director of The Aadizookaan—for a discussion on the possibilities and challenges for artists and arts organizations creating and presenting artwork that explores sustainability and the environment. The Long Table format was born from director and scholar Lois Weaver’s exercise on participation and public engagement. Its aim is to foster civic-minded discussions on ideas and questions surrounding the city’s creative culture. It’s a dinner table atmosphere encouraging participants to ask questions, make statements, leave comments, or openly sit, listen, and watch.

For more information about additional programs for Mattingly’s residency and related to The World to Come exhibition, click here.

Mary Mattingly’s residency is presented in partnership with the Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s Festival Footprint Initiative established with generous support from  Toyota.


The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

Labor in the Global Platform Economy

Making the “Future of Work” Work

The first of two panel discussions open to the public as part of a two-day National Science Foundation-funded workshop on Making the “Future of Work” Work. 

From voice assistances that replicate how care and service professions manage their own emotions to surveillance technologies powered by outsourced, contracted coding work, emotional, gendered, and racialized labor are the sources of “smart” technologies writ large. How does the promise of a better, hopeful “future of work” reproduce or contest exploitative regimes of labor? How does the promise of living the “good life,” of becoming the “smart” self, and individual empowerment prohibit other forms of solidarity?

Presenters: 
Nathan Ensmenger, Indiana University 
Mary Gray, Microsoft Research
Lilly Irani, UC San Diego
Cara Wallis, Texas A&M

Discussants:
Sarah Murray and Lisa Nakamura, University of Michigan

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Roundtable and Q&A with Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini Sloan

Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini SloanPlease join us in the Hopwood Room for a discussion between essayists Hilton Als and Aisha Sabatini Sloan. This lunchtime event will be catered; food will be available at 11:30, and the discussion will start at noon.

Hilton Als began contributing to The New Yorker in 1989, writing pieces for ‘The Talk of the Town,’ he became a staff writer in 1994, theatre critic in 2002, and lead theater critic in 2012. Week after week, he brings to the magazine a rigorous, sharp, and lyrical perspective on acting, playwriting, and directing. With his deep knowledge of the history of performance—not only in theatre but in dance, music, and visual art—he shows us how to view a production and how to place its director, its author, and its performers in the ongoing continuum of dramatic art. His reviews are not simply reviews; they are provocative contributions to the discourse on theatre, race, class, sexuality, and identity in America. Als is an associate professor of writing at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and has taught at Yale University, Wesleyan, and Smith College. He lives in New York City.

Aisha Sabatini Sloan was born and raised in Los Angeles. Her writing about race and current events is often coupled with analysis of art, film and pop culture. She studied English Literature at Carleton College and went on to earn an MA in Cultural Studies and Studio Art from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the University of Arizona. Her essay collection, The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White was published by the University of Iowa Press in 2013. Her most recent essay collection, Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, was just chosen by Maggie Nelson as the winner of the 1913 Open Prose Contest and will be published in 2017. She is currently a Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

2019 Robert F. Berkhofer Jr. Lecture: An Evening With Mary Kathryn Nagle

“Native Theater in the 21st Century: Piercing the Invisibility and Restoring Our Humanity,” by Mary Kathryn Nagle

PictureNative American Studies at the University of Michigan presents the 2019 Robert F. Berkhofer Jr. Lecture: An Evening With Mary Kathryn Nagle
“Native Theater in the 21st Century: Piercing the Invisibility and Restoring Our Humanity”

This event is free and open to the public. There will be a catered reception to follow the lecture.

Mary Kathryn Nagle is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation. She currently serves as the Executive Director of the Yale Indigenous Performing Arts Program. She is also a partner at Pipestem Law, P.C., where she works to protect tribal sovereignty and the inherent right of Indian Nations to protect their women and children from domestic violence and sexual assault. Nagle has authored numerous briefs in federal appellate courts, including the United States Supreme Court. Nagle studied theater and social justice at Georgetown University as an undergraduate student, and received her J.D. from Tulane Law School where she graduated summe cum laude and received the John Minor Wisdom Award. She is a frequent speaker at law schools and symposia across the country. Her articles have been published in law review journals including the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender, Yale Law Journal (online forum), Tulsa Law Review, and Tulane Law Review, among others.

Nagle is an alumn of the 2012 PUBLIC THEATER Emerging Writers Group, where she developed her play “Manahatta” in PUBLIC STUDIO (May 2014). Productions include “Miss Lead” (Amerinda, 59E59, January 2014), and “Fairly Traceable” (Native Voices at the Autry, March 2017), “Sovereignty” (Arena Stage), “Manahatta” (Oregon Shakespeare Festival), and Return to Niobrara (Rose Theater). In 2019, Portland Center Stage will produce the world premiere of “Crossing Mnisose.”

Nagle has received commissions from Arena Stage (“Sovereignty”), the Rose Theater (“Return to Niobrara,” Omaha, Nebraska), Portland Center Stage (“Mnisose”), Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Yale Repertory Theatre (“A Pipe for February”), and Round House Theater. 

The Berkhofer Lecture series (named for a former U-M professor and founder of the field of Native American studies) was established in 2014 by an alumni gift from the Dan and Carmen Brenner family of Seattle, Washington. In close consultation with the Brenners, Native American Studies decided to create a public lecture series featuring prominent, marquee speakers who would draw audiences from different communities (faculty and students, Ann Arbor and Detroit, and Michigan tribal communities as well as writers and readers of all persuasions). Native American students at U-M have consistently expressed their desire to make Native Americans more visible both on campus and off, and we believe that this lecture takes a meaningful step in that direction. Additionally, because of the statewide publicity it generates, we think it is already becoming another recruitment incentive for Native American students. It goes without saying that the speakers we are inviting provide tremendous value to the mission and work of Native American Studies at U-M.

African Women Film Series – Notre Étrangère (The Place in Between) Film Screening

Film series flyerThe University of Michigan’s CEW+, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, and African Studies Center are pleased to present the 2018-2019 African Women Film Series. These exciting films celebrate women’s voices through rich, dynamic, and intimate visual portrayals.

All films will screen in the Michigan Theater Screening Room at 603 E. Liberty St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104.

Register here.

Cultural Racism & American Social Structure

Presented by the University of Michigan RacismLab

A winter 2019 interdisciplinary speaker series sponsored by the
Institute for Social Research Survey Research Center and Rackham Graduate School

All talks are held at the Institute for Social Research (426 Thompson Street)
Room 1430 at 9:00-10:30 am

Historical trauma: Racial dispossession & Native populations
Monday, March 25
Joseph Gone, Professor
Dept of Global Health & Social Medicine, Harvard University

RacismLab Speaker Series 2019

Facebook: /racizmlab
Twitter: @racismlab

AMAS Film Screening: “Muslimah’s Guide to Marriage”

Professor Amina Bakeer Abdul-Jabbaar

 

Poster

Short Synopsis of the Film:
 
Muslimah Muhammad, a twenty-something African-American orthodox Muslim Woman who lives in Inglewood, CA, has seven days and fourteen hours left in her Iddah (Muslim separation) before she will officially be divorced from her cheating husband. Knowing that the divorce would upset her religious father and the local Muslim community, Muslimah works diligently to try to fix her broken marriage before it is too late. 

Director’s Intro: Aminah Bakeer Abdul-Jabbaar

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/250992626

Director’s Bio:
Writer/Producer/Director/Professor in the Pan African Studies Department at California State University, Los Angeles. Aminah is from South Central LA. She holds a B.A. from USC in Cinema TV and an M.F.A. in Directing from UCLA’s Film & TV Department. Aminah participated in IFP/FIND’s Project Involve and IFP/FIND’S Screenwriter’s Lab. Her short, PERSONAL TOUCH, which deals with her mother’s death from breast cancer, won the Liddel Art Award from the Ann Arbor Film Festival and screened on PBS. She also wrote and directed DORSEY, a Multi-Camera TV Pilot about colorism in the Black Community (starring: Christy Knowings, Wesley Jonathan, and Wesley Jonathan), which got Aminah a Directing Internship at THE YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS and she was featured on ET. Next, Aminah won the Visionary Award at the Pan African Film Festival for BILALIAN, a feature-length documentary about African-American Muslims in America and in Africa, and received glowing reviews in several publications including “Variety” and was broadcast on BET. After, Aminah co-wrote, produced, and directed the web series BedRest (starring: Pratima Anae and Tiffany Haddish), a comedy about a woman trapped on Bed Rest and played on Blip.TV. Aminah is represented by 3 Arts Entertainment and UTA.