Bioethics Discussion: Overpopulation

OverpopulationOverpopulation
A discussion on one to(o) many.

For more information and/or to receive a copy of the readings contact Barry Belmont at belmont@umich.edu or visit https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/bioethics-discussion-group/discussions/.

Please also swing by the blog: https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/incidental-art/

The Community of Food, Society & Justice Conference

The ways that we meet the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice are among the greatest challenges facing our Nation and the world today. Centuries of unsustainable agricultural practices and inequitable food distribution place our food systems in peril. How to address these challenges and feed a hungry population raise transformative issues for our communities and academics committed to sustainability and food justice throughout the world.

The Community of Food, Society & Justice Conference will engage students, faculty, staff, and the community in a rigorous intellectual dialogue around these challenges. The conference will be structured around a foundation of interdisciplinary scholarship that agrees that recognizing structural relations of power are necessary in order to confront race, class, and gender privileges on issues such as food justice.

The conference is free and open to all students, faculty, staff, and the public.

Register Here >>>

Webinar: Accelerating Collective Learning and Action for Enhanced Resilience

As the pace of climate change accelerates, there is a need to also accelerate collective learning about how best to prepare and adapt.

Members of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) and partners, in part supported by the Science Collaborative, have been working on the frontlines to help communities enhance their resilience, for example by sharing lessons about how to communicate about climate change, producing critical scientific insights, and working with local and state partners to strategically advance action on the ground.

Join us for a lively discussion among four panelists that have been taking different approaches for helping communities anticipate and prepare for climate impacts. This webinar is designed to explore lessons learned about how best to accelerate learning and the transfer of ideas across the diverse adaptation community.

Register here

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Bioethics Discussion: Extinction

Extinction
A discussion on our (inevitable?) ends.

Readings to consider:
“The nature of extinction”
“Extinction risk from climate change”
“Extinction and overspecialization: the dark side of human innovation”
“The ethics of de-extinction”

For more information and/or to receive a copy of the readings, please contact Barry Belmont at belmont@umich.edu or visit: https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/bioethics-discussion-group/discussions/030-extinction/.

Please also check out the blog, while there’s still time: https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/incidental-art/.

ELPP Lecture Series: The Environment, Human Rights and Immunity at the World Bank

Professor David Hunter, American University Washington College of Law

Please join us for the latest installment of the Environmental Law and Policy Program Lecture Series, presented by Professor David Hunter from the American University Washington College of Law. Professor Hunter will discuss the global campaign to hold international financial Institutions like the World Bank accountable for the environmental damage and human rights violations caused by their projects. This will include the implications of Jam v. International Finance Corporation (IFC), a case pending before the US Supreme Court that challenges the World Bank’s claim of immunity. The case was brought by local fishermen in coastal India harmed by a coal-fired power plant. The case reflects one of several strategies for applying minimum environmental and human rights standards to the activities of international organizations. 

This event is free and open to the public. 

David Hunter is Professor of international and comparative environmental law at American University’s Washington College of Law. He currently serves on the Boards of Directors of Accountability Counsel, the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, and the Project on Government Oversight. He is a Member Scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform and a member of the Organization of American States’ Expert Group on Environmental Law, the InterAmerican Network for Environmental Law’s Advisory Board, and the Strategic Advisors Group for the International Finance Corporation’s Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman. He is co-author of International Environmental Law & Policy (5th ed.) and Climate Change Law (2nd ed.). His research interests include human rights and the environment, environmental standards and accountability mechanisms in international finance, and climate change litigation, law and policy.

 

Third Annual MUSE Conference

Michigan University-wide Sustainability and Environment Conference

The annual MUSE Conference will be held February 21-22, 2019.

The purpose of the conference is to foster connections and new collaborations across the broad suite of sustainability and environment-related research at the University of Michigan. We welcome participation from those advancing knowledge through work in the humanities and the social, physical, natural, and engineering sciences.

Keynote speakers include Perrin Selcer (History), Barry Rabe (Public Policy), and Melissa Stults (Sustainability and Innovations Manager, City of Ann Arbor). The concluding panel will also feature a roundtable with Dean Jonathan Overpeck (SEAS), Dean DuBois Bowman (Public Health), and Jennifer Haverkamp, Director of the Graham Sustainability Institute.

For more information, including the link to register for the conference and RSVP for the public reception, please visit http://muse-initiative.umich.edu/conference/

Please send all inquiries to MUSE-inquiries@umich.edu.

February 21,  2019, 2:30pm-7:00pm & February 22, 2019, 9:30 am-5:30 pm @ Rackham Graduate School

RSVP required:  Friday, February 22, 2019, 6:00-8:00 @ Zingerman’s Greyline