The Community of Food, Society & Justice Conference

The ways that we meet the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice are among the greatest challenges facing our Nation and the world today. Centuries of unsustainable agricultural practices and inequitable food distribution place our food systems in peril. How to address these challenges and feed a hungry population raise transformative issues for our communities and academics committed to sustainability and food justice throughout the world.

The Community of Food, Society & Justice Conference will engage students, faculty, staff, and the community in a rigorous intellectual dialogue around these challenges. The conference will be structured around a foundation of interdisciplinary scholarship that agrees that recognizing structural relations of power are necessary in order to confront race, class, and gender privileges on issues such as food justice.

The conference is free and open to all students, faculty, staff, and the public.

Register Here >>>

US-China Environment and Sustainability Forum

The world today is facing unprecedented, interconnected environmental and sustainability challenges. Achieving sustainable development requires global efforts that are ambitious, action-oriented and collaborative. The US and China are the leaders of the global economy. At the same time, they also contribute significantly to many sustainability challenges worldwide. Both countries play particularly important roles for global sustainability. By bring together experts from both the US and China on environment and sustainability, the US-China Environment and Sustainability Forum at the University of Michigan (UCESF@UM) aims to: Take stock of achievements in addressing environmental and sustainability challenges in both countries, and identify critical areas that the two countries should work together and help the global transition towards more sustainable development. UCESF@UM will produce a whitepaper summarizing opinions and conclusions. To promote an intimate experience for easy engagement in conversation, attendance is capped at 120 participants including invited panelists and reserved seats for University of Michigan participants.

RSVP Here

Earthfest

Join SEAS at Earthfest for free food, entertainment, activities and a chance to learn new things about sustainability at U-M that you didn’t already know. The event is organized around the four themes of our Campus Sustainability Goals: Climate Action, Waste Prevention, Healthy Environments and Community Awareness.

Every fall since 1996 University of Michigan has held an event to celebrate all of the environmental and energy initiatives throughout the University and the Ann Arbor community. The event originated as Energy Fest but since 2010 has been known as EarthFest: Party for the Planet!

Come browse dozens of booths with information on how to get involved in sustainability on campus and beyond. Enjoy free healthy food, chef demos, live entertainment, and sustainability-related games with prizes! You’ll also have the chance to make a photo pledge to sustainability, and an opportunity to win sustainable foods basket by sharing your photo on Planet Blue Facebook or Twitter.

For more information, visit http://sustainability.umich.edu/earthfest.

The Eco Book Club and The World to Come

​Literati’s Eco Book Club goes on the road. Join us at UMMA on the occasion of the Museum’s exhibition of The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene. This thought-provoking exhibition grapples with the negative impact of human activity on the planet through the art of more than thirty-five international artists such as Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth. Discussions will be led by Literati’s Eco Book Club facilitator Alison Swan.

Alison Swan’s poems and essays have appeared in many places, including her poetry chapbooks Before the Snow Moon and Dog Heart, and the recent award-winning anthologies Elemental: A Collection of Michigan Creative Nonfiction, Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology, and Here: Women Writing on the Upper Peninsula. Her anthology Fresh Water: Women Writing on the Great Lakes is a Michigan Notable Book. A Mesa Refuge alum and a Petoskey Prize for Grassroots Environmental Leadership co-winner, she teaches literature and writing at the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at Western Michigan University and lives in Ann Arbor.

Sunday, June 2, 3 p.m. Great Tide Rising: Towards Clarity and Moral Courage in a Time of Planetary Change by Kathleen Dean Moore. Join UMMA’s award-winning docents for a tour of The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene at 2 p.m.

Sunday, July 28, 3 p.m. Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Preceding the Book Club, join curator Jennifer Friess and Education Outreach Program Coordinator Grace VanderVliet at 2 p.m. for “Cross Pollination,” a tour of the environmental themes in three exhibitions at UMMA: The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene; The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq​; and​ Jason DeMarte: Garden of Artificial Delights.

Participants are welcome to join us for one or both of the Book Club meetings. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Long Table Discussion: Art / Environment / Sustainability

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a three-day residency, June 27–30. Mattingly, whose photograph, Life of Objects, is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. The centerpiece of the residency is a large-scale public art project titled Objects in the Round, in the Annex tent at Top of the Park on Ingalls Mall where festivalgoers will build a miniature landscape with Mattingly that explores relationships with objects, built landscapes, and habits of consumption.   To kick off her residency, Mattingly will be joined by thought leaders from U-M and beyond—A2SF’s James Carter, UMMA curator Jennifer Friess, arts curator of the U-M Institute for the Humanities Amanda Krugliak, director of the Huron River Watershed Council Laura Rubin, Detroit-based interdisciplinary artist Sacramento Knoxx, independent film director and producer Diane Cheklich, and Christy Bieber, co-director of The Aadizookaan—for a discussion on the possibilities and challenges for artists and arts organizations creating and presenting artwork that explores sustainability and the environment. The Long Table format was born from director and scholar Lois Weaver’s exercise on participation and public engagement. Its aim is to foster civic-minded discussions on ideas and questions surrounding the city’s creative culture. It’s a dinner table atmosphere encouraging participants to ask questions, make statements, leave comments, or openly sit, listen, and watch.

For more information about additional programs for Mattingly’s residency and related to The World to Come exhibition, click here.

Mary Mattingly’s residency is presented in partnership with the Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s Festival Footprint Initiative established with generous support from  Toyota.


The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

In Conversation: The World to Come: Art in a Changing Climate

What role do artists play in visualizing the Anthropocene, our current epoch of rapid and often-destructive ecological change? Using photography, video, drawing, and sculpture, the forty-five international artists in The World to Come respond to the impact of climate change around the globe. Join UMMA Assistant Curator of Photography Jennifer Friess for a discussion about how the artists on view reimagine humanity’s relationships with each other and the environment in the world today and to come.  

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation  for  the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn,  Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group  of  environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment,  Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

MUSE Workshop: Discussion: ethics, big data, and our response to climate change

Tom Logan (Industrial and Operations Engineering)

MUSE workshopThe MUSE workshop is a Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop that brings together sustainability researchers from across the university to discuss ideas and promote interdisciplinary connections and collaborations.
The workshops are informal gatherings with a facilitator who leads an often wide-ranging discussion.
Workshops occur at least biweekly (with special workshops arising for hot topics). Check out the line up of further speakers

Bioethics Discussion: Extinction

Extinction
A discussion on our (inevitable?) ends.

Readings to consider:
“The nature of extinction”
“Extinction risk from climate change”
“Extinction and overspecialization: the dark side of human innovation”
“The ethics of de-extinction”

For more information and/or to receive a copy of the readings, please contact Barry Belmont at belmont@umich.edu or visit: https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/bioethics-discussion-group/discussions/030-extinction/.

Please also check out the blog, while there’s still time: https://belmont.bme.umich.edu/incidental-art/.