Private Landowners, Public Policy, and the Energy Revolution

Jeffrey Jacquet, Assistant Professor
School of Environment and Natural Resources
Ohio State University

Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Betty Ford Classroom (1110)
735 S. State Street, Ann Arbor 48109-3091

11:30am-1:00pm (pizza lunch provided)
Free and open to the public

poster graphic

About the lecture: The United States has seen dramatic growth in energy development with much of it occurring on privately owned lands, creating a unique raft of opportunity and risk for landowners. The presentation reviews research on the nexus of property ownership rights and regulatory policy, with a focus on Shale and Wind Energy. It introduces the concept of ‘Private Participation’ in the planning and siting of energy projects and discusses how private property ownership will continue to influence the energy revolution.

Jeffrey Jacquet is Assistant Professor at Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources. He is a rural and natural resource sociologist with a focus on energy development, including social impacts from the development of renewables and fossil fuels. Other focus areas include rural community development, social impact assessment and the social-psychology of environmental change.

Sponsored by: University of Michigan Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP)

Co-Sponsors: The University of Michigan’s Graham Sustainability Institute, Energy Institute, Program in the Environment (PitE), Environmental Law & Policy Program (ELPP), and School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS)

For more information visit www.closup.umich.edu or call 734-647-4091. Follow on Twitter @closup

NOSB Great Lakes Bowl- Volunteer Opportunity (Final Call)

Event Date:
Saturday, February 3, 2018, 8:45 am

WHAT is it?

The NOSB Great Lakes Bowl

WHERE is it?

Dana Building (SEAS)

WHEN

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018

WHY should I care?

You’ll get to…

  • engage with a fantastic group of people (Michigan Sea Grant, fellow U of M students, local organizations/agencies, and more!)
  • assist in operating one of many NOSB regional quiz-bowl competitions taking place across the U.S.
  • inspire local competing high school students with your experiences and stories
  • test your knowledge in Great Lakes and ocean science
  • feast on tons of free food
  • receive a free T shirt designed by talented folks at Michigan Sea Grant
  • HAVE FUN!!!

If you’re interested, please add your name to the Google Sheet found here.

IMPORTANT TIMELINE!

  • You MUST have your name on the sign-up sheet by December 2nd, 2017, to be submitted for the background check (note: If you completed the background check last year, please indicate this on the excel sheet. You won’t have to complete another one this year).
  • Code of Conduct training must also be completed and can be found at this link This will only take a few minutes of your time.

Related Link(s):
Volunteer List
Event Details

Contact person(s):
Hannah Schaefer hschaef@umich.edu

Send by email

Environmental & Occupational Health Risks of Mining in Congo

NIOSH ERC Seminar: Possible health impacts of metal mining & processing in Katanga, Democratic Republic of the Congo

1:00 pm @ 1690 SPH I

The extraction and processing of minerals containing copper, cobalt and other metals in southern Katanga have been demonstrated to cause substantial exposure to potentially toxic metals not only among mine workers, but also among their families and the general population.  The public health impact of such pollution is difficult to assess but evidence of adverse health effects is emerging. (National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health/NIOSH, UM Center for Occupational Health & Safety Engineering/COHSE, Education & Research Center/ERC)

Meredith McGehee | Administrative Assistant Senior to Sioban Harlow & the Center for Midlife Science | 6610 SPH I | Dept of Epidemiology |1415 Washington Heights | Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 | mcgehee@umich.edu | 734.647.0819 | Center for Midlife Science

Faculty Director, Center for Value Chain Innovation

Co-Director, Technology and Business Innovation Forum

Research Fellow, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan

Faculty Associate, The Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation at the University of Michigan

Colonel William G. and Ann C. Svetlich Professor of Operations Research and Management

Stephen Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, 701 Tappan Avenue, R5418, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Ph734-615-8621Email: anupindi@umich.eduTwitter: @RAnupindi; Skype: ranupindi

 

Private Landowners, Public Policy, and the Energy Revolution

Jeffrey Jacquet, Assistant Professor, School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State University

poster graphic
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Betty Ford Classroom (1110)
735 S. State Street, Ann Arbor 48109-3091
11:30am-1:00pm (pizza lunch provided)

Free and open to the public

About the lecture: The United States has seen dramatic growth in energy development with much of it occurring on privately owned lands, creating a unique raft of opportunity and risk for landowners. The presentation reviews research on the nexus of property ownership rights and regulatory policy, with a focus on Shale and Wind Energy. It introduces the concept of ‘Private Participation’ in the planning and siting of energy projects and discusses how private property ownership will continue to influence the energy revolution.

Jeffrey Jacquet is Assistant Professor at Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources. He is a rural and natural resource sociologist with a focus on energy development, including social impacts from the development of renewables and fossil fuels. Other focus areas include rural community development, social impact assessment and the social-psychology of environmental change.

Sponsored by: University of Michigan Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP)

Co-Sponsors: The University of Michigan’s Graham Sustainability Institute, Energy Institute, Program in the Environment (PitE), Environmental Law & Policy Program (ELPP), and School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS)

For more information visit www.closup.umich.edu or call 734-647-4091. Follow on Twitter @closup

Environmental & Occupational Health Risks of Mining in Congo

Environmental Research Seminar: Metal exposure in mine workers and their families in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

12:00 pm @ 3755 SPH I

In this seminar, examples will be shown of how artisanal mining of strategic commodities such as cobalt, gold or coltan is done in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and how this may lead to high uptakes of potentially toxic trace metals not only among mine workers, but also among their families and populations living close to mines.

Meredith McGehee | Administrative Assistant Senior to Sioban Harlow & the Center for Midlife Science | 6610 SPH I | Dept of Epidemiology |1415 Washington Heights | Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 | mcgehee@umich.edu | 734.647.0819 | Center for Midlife Science

Faculty Director, Center for Value Chain Innovation

Co-Director, Technology and Business Innovation Forum

Research Fellow, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan

Faculty Associate, The Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation at the University of Michigan

Colonel William G. and Ann C. Svetlich Professor of Operations Research and Management

Stephen Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, 701 Tappan Avenue, R5418, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Ph734-615-8621Email: anupindi@umich.eduTwitter: @RAnupindi; Skype: ranupindi

 

 

Environmental & Occupational Health Risks of Mining in Congo

Film screening & Discussion: When Elephants Fight

4:00 pm @ 1755 SPH I

Directed by Michael Ramsdell and narrated by Robin Wright. This film explores the situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is minerally rich, and yet these very minerals, necessary to sustain today’s technology, contribute to ongoing strife and conflict-related gender based violence in the DRC.

Meredith McGehee | Administrative Assistant Senior to Sioban Harlow & the Center for Midlife Science | 6610 SPH I | Dept of Epidemiology |1415 Washington Heights | Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 | mcgehee@umich.edu | 734.647.0819 | Center for Midlife Science

Faculty Director, Center for Value Chain Innovation

Co-Director, Technology and Business Innovation Forum

Research Fellow, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan

Faculty Associate, The Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation at the University of Michigan

Colonel William G. and Ann C. Svetlich Professor of Operations Research and Management

Stephen Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, 701 Tappan Avenue, R5418, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Ph734-615-8621Email: anupindi@umich.eduTwitter: @RAnupindi; Skype: ranupindi

 

 

Healing Justice, Waging Love: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Ourselves An evening of song, spoken word, and hip-hop with The Long Hairz Collective

Keene Theater East Quad
701 East University Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Native American Studies- American Culture, Center for Educational Outreach, School for Environment and Sustainability, Semester in Detroit, Residential College, Native American Students Association and the Black Student Union presents:

The Longhairz Collective Featuring Annie Humphrey, Allison Radell, Peace Be Free, Joe Reilly, and Will See

An evening of song, spoken word, and hip-hop with The Long Hairz Collective
Featuring Annie Humphrey, Allison Radell, Peace Be Free, Joe Reilly, and Will See

The Long Hairz Collective is a diverse group of artist-activist water protectors promoting environmental justice through music, spoken word and cultural organizing. Formed on the University of Michigan Ann Arbor campus in 2000, the Long Hairz connect Black communities in Detroit and Native communities in Minnesota and Northern Michigan and weave networks of mutual support throughout the Midwest.

Featuring Native American singer songwriters Annie Humphrey, Allison Radell, and Joe Reilly and African American MCs and spoken word artists Will See and Peace Be Free, the Long Hairz bring their art-activism of water protection and environmental justice to communities throughout the Midwest.

Brian Babb, aka Peace Be Free, is a spoken word artist, MC, and social worker from San Diego, California. He has offered his oratory skills in support of many bands and musical artists, including XIV, Shammy Dee, and as a member of the Long Hairz Collective. He recently released a single with XIV called The Instrument.

Annie Humphrey is an Anishinaabe singer, songwriter, and activist. Growing up on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation in Northern Minnesota, Annie lived in a home filled with voices made of thunder and nothing could stop it. Her parents were brilliant people individually. Her father, a singer and musician and her mother an artist and poet. Together they made sadness. Each of her parents taught Annie the beautiful things they knew. They showed her that she carried their gifts in her hands too. This is how creating art and music came about for her. This is what saved her. This is how she lives now. A recipient of multiple Native American Music Awards, Annie has released six albums and collaborated with many other Native artists including John Trudell and Keith Secola. In 2016 she organized The Beast and the Garden tour, featuring the Long Hairz Collective, in opposition to Enbridge’s proposed expansion of Line 3 in Minnesota.

Allison Radell is an inspiring and creative pianist, singer, and songwriter who believes deeply in protecting the sacred. She has studied classical and jazz piano and influences of jazz, rock, blues, and traditional Native American songs come through in her music. Allison (Powhatan) is also a fancy shawl pow wow dancer, and enjoys singing and dancing for her ancestors and elders in the sacred circle, remembering the contributions they have made to her life. She released her debut album Peachy Keyn in 2014.

Joe Reilly is a singer, songwriter, and activist who writes songs that invite listeners to heal their relationships with themselves, with each other, and with the earth. Joe uses his music to bring people together and build community across lines of race, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, age, and nationality. Joe is Italian, Irish, and Native American (Cherokee) and has recorded eight albums of his music, including three children’s albums, Children of the Earth (2007), Let’s Go Outside (2011), and The Circle (Earthwork Music, 2016).

Will See is an environmental justice activist, cultural worker, and MC from Detroit. He is a student of tai chi and the metaphysical martial arts. He uses facilitation to organize popular education, movement schools, Peoples’ Assemblies, and other liberating spaces. He worked as Co-Director of the East Michigan Environmental Action Council (EMEAC) and served as a Local Coordinator for the 2010 US Social Forum among other activist projects in Detroit and across the region. His solo hip-hop CD The Basics includes EJ anthems such as “Water Power” and “Respiration.” His second project is a spiritual mixtape called SOL SWGGR. In his third project, #Detroitdiplomat, he brings Detroit to the world and brings the world to the D.

Is RSVP required? No
RSVP form

Event Contact Info

Elizabeth James
(734)-764-5517
ecnirp@umich.edu
https://lsa.umich.edu/daas

UM-WiSER Mellon Workshop. Decolonizing Sites of Culture in Africa and Beyond

Keynote Speakers: Annie Coombes, University of London; Morag Kersel, DePaul University; Ugochukwu-Smooth C. Nzewi, The Cleveland Museum of Art; Mbongiseni Buthelezi, Public Affairs Research Institute, South Africa

This 2.5 day workshop, bringing together scholars, theorists, practitioners, artists and cultural producers, will examine and reflect on strategies of decolonization in presentations of public culture in museums, galleries, and heritage sites. Free and open to the public. Registration requested at bit.ly/asc-mellon2017.

For a detailed workshop schedule and museum tour, visit: ii.umich.edu/asc