Detroit Month of Design

Detroit Month of Design returns this September 2019 for a month long celebration of design!

Detroit Month of Design is a citywide celebration of creativity that gathers designers and the greater community to celebrate Detroit’s role as a national and global design capital. Partners from emerging studios, established companies, and educational institutions across Detroit will come together to show off their latest work and ideas. The cross-disciplinary events take place in all corners of the city, highlighting the work that makes Detroit a UNESCO City of Design.

A complete schedule will be available in early August. Most events are free and open to the public. 

African World Festival

The 37th annual African World Festival is bringing over 150,000 attendees to the grounds of The Wright Museum. With performances, poetry, arts and crafts, African drumming and dance, hundreds of vendors, authentic foods of the diaspora and more, this FREE 3-day festival is for the entire family!

This weekend-long event is sponsored by Ford Motor Company Fund, Heritage Works, Wayne State University, Domino’s Pizza, Knight Foundation, and Go RVing.

Full event information at the Wright website.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Long Table Discussion: Art / Environment / Sustainability

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a three-day residency, June 27–30. Mattingly, whose photograph, Life of Objects, is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. The centerpiece of the residency is a large-scale public art project titled Objects in the Round, in the Annex tent at Top of the Park on Ingalls Mall where festivalgoers will build a miniature landscape with Mattingly that explores relationships with objects, built landscapes, and habits of consumption.   To kick off her residency, Mattingly will be joined by thought leaders from U-M and beyond—A2SF’s James Carter, UMMA curator Jennifer Friess, arts curator of the U-M Institute for the Humanities Amanda Krugliak, director of the Huron River Watershed Council Laura Rubin, Detroit-based interdisciplinary artist Sacramento Knoxx, independent film director and producer Diane Cheklich, and Christy Bieber, co-director of The Aadizookaan—for a discussion on the possibilities and challenges for artists and arts organizations creating and presenting artwork that explores sustainability and the environment. The Long Table format was born from director and scholar Lois Weaver’s exercise on participation and public engagement. Its aim is to foster civic-minded discussions on ideas and questions surrounding the city’s creative culture. It’s a dinner table atmosphere encouraging participants to ask questions, make statements, leave comments, or openly sit, listen, and watch.

For more information about additional programs for Mattingly’s residency and related to The World to Come exhibition, click here.

Mary Mattingly’s residency is presented in partnership with the Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s Festival Footprint Initiative established with generous support from  Toyota.


The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Penny Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series: Juliana Huxtable: POST

https://stamps.umich.edu/images/uploads/lectures/huxtable.jpgThe iconic Juliana Huxtable is an American artist, writer, performer, and musician. Exploring the intersections of race, gender, queerness, technology and identity, Huxtable uses a diverse set of means to engage these issues, including self-portraiture, text-based prints, performance, nightlife, music, writing, and social media. Huxtable does not privilege any method over another, and the lines between different forms of her work are often fluid. This approach aids Huxtable in her ongoing critiques of existing social norms and categorical distinctions while indicating alternate, more hopeful possibilities. Huxtable references her own body and history as a transgender African American woman as she challenges the socio-political and cultural forces that inform normative conceptions of gender and sexuality. Huxtable’s Art and Performance work has been featured at Roskilde Festival, Denmark (2018), ReWire Festival, Netherlands (2018), Park Avenue Armory, New York (2018), Reena Spauldings, Solo show, New York (2017), Project Native Informant, London UK, (2017) MoMA PS1, New York (2014); “Take Ecstasy with Me,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Frieze Projects, London (2014); and 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2015); among other venues. She lives and works in New York, where she is the founder and DJ for Shock Value. And part of House of Ladosha a nightlife collective run by artists, DJs, writers, and fashion icons.​
Huxtable’s work is included in Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art from December 15, 2018 to April 7, 2019. Organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the exhibition examines the radical impact of internet culture on visual art since the invention of the web in 1989. This exhibition presents more than forty works across a variety of media—painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects. It features work by some of the most important artists working today, including Judith Barry, Juliana Huxtable, Pierre Huyghe, Josh Kline, Laura Owens, Trevor Paglen, Seth Price, Cindy Sherman, Frances Stark, and Martine Syms.

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Art in the Age of the Internet: 1989 to Today: Juliana Huxtable

https://stamps.umich.edu/images/uploads/lectures/huxtable.jpg

The iconic Juliana Huxtable is an American artist, writer, performer, and musician. Exploring the intersections of race, gender, queerness, technology and identity, Huxtable uses a diverse set of means to engage these issues, including self-portraiture, text-based prints, performance, nightlife, music, writing, and social media. Huxtable does not privilege any method over another, and the lines between different forms of her work are often fluid. This approach aids Huxtable in her ongoing critiques of existing social norms and categorical distinctions while indicating alternate, more hopeful possibilities. Huxtable references her own body and history as a transgender African American woman as she challenges the socio-political and cultural forces that inform normative conceptions of gender and sexuality. Huxtable’s Art and Performance work has been featured at Roskilde Festival, Denmark (2018), ReWire Festival, Netherlands (2018), Park Avenue Armory, New York (2018), Reena Spauldings, Solo show, New York (2017), Project Native Informant, London UK, (2017) MoMA PS1, New York (2014); “Take Ecstasy with Me,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Frieze Projects, London (2014); and 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2015); among other venues. She lives and works in New York, where she is the founder and DJ for Shock Value. And part of House of Ladosha a nightlife collective run by artists, DJs, writers, and fashion icons.​

Huxtable’s work is included in Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art from December 15, 2018 to April 7, 2019. Organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the exhibition examines the radical impact of internet culture on visual art since the invention of the web in 1989. This exhibition presents more than forty works across a variety of media—painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects. It features work by some of the most important artists working today, including Judith Barry, Juliana Huxtable, Pierre Huyghe, Josh Kline, Laura Owens, Trevor Paglen, Seth Price, Cindy Sherman, Frances Stark, and Martine Syms.

Major funding for Ms. Huxtable’s residency was provided by The Faculty Alliance for Diversity at the University of Michigan School of Social Work.

Michigan Social Work gratefully acknowledges for their support, the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series, the University of Michigan Museum of Art, The Institute for Research on Woman and Gender, and The Spectrum Center.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors:
Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors:
William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga  

University of Michigan Funding Partners:
School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

Photo: © Juri-Hiensch.

impactXchange–VOTING

Ruby Sales–Building a Vibrant Youth Culture

One Vote, One Difference

North Campus DEI Collaborative–College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, Duderstadt Center, School of Music, Theater and Dance, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Rackham Student Government

Join the North Campus DEI Collaborative impactXchange–College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, Duderstadt Center, School of Music, Theater and Dance, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and the Rackham Student Government in celebration of Diversity Week 2018.

The all day celebration aims to put students in the driver’s seat of decision making. We will explore the topic of VOTING and how voting and not voting impacts students and their peers (students will be able to register to vote too!). Students will learn what they can do in their communities to create change (regardless if they can vote or not). Live performances, exhibition posters on voting, workshops, food, and entertainment will make this event one that must not be missed.

When: Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Where: The Grove and Duderstadt Center
Time: 11:30am-1:00pm
Special Guest: Ruby Sales–Building a Vibrant Youth Culture at 6:30pm in the new Taubman College Commons.
Light refreshments will be served.

Ruby Nell Sales looks at her work as a calling rather than a career. She answered the call to social justice as a teenager at Tuskegee Institute where she joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and worked on voter registration in Lowndes County, Alabama. Sales has made the struggle for racial justice one of the centerpieces of her work through the SpiritHouse Project. Recognizing a need to nurture the hope that still resides in young people as well as to revive an intergenerational community and human compassion, in 2016 the SpiritHouse Project introduced Hope Zones.™ They are alternative learning spaces designed to strengthen the hope, courage, reason, and will of young people to individually and collectively stand up for themselves with dignity, clarity and nonviolent persistence. According to the Harvard Gazette, Ruby spoke about the fight for racial equality in the U.S. and shared, “Even in the face of challenges, there are reasons for hope. Freedom must be seen as a constant struggle. We don’t have to give in to despair.”

Earth Fest

Join SEAS at Earthfest for free food, entertainment, activities and a chance to learn new things about sustainability at U-M that you didn’t already know. The event is organized around the four themes of our Campus Sustainability Goals: Climate Action, Waste Prevention, Healthy Environments and Community Awareness.

Every fall since 1996 University of Michigan has held an event to celebrate all of the environmental and energy initiatives throughout the University and the Ann Arbor community. The event originated as Energy Fest but since 2010 has been known as EarthFest: Party for the Planet!

Come browse dozens of booths with information on how to get involved in sustainability on campus and beyond. Enjoy free healthy food, chef demos, live entertainment, and sustainability-related games with prizes! You’ll also have the chance to make a photo pledge to sustainability, and an opportunity to win sustainable foods basket by sharing your photo on Planet Blue Facebook or Twitter.

For more information, visit http://sustainability.umich.edu/earthfest.

MESA-Palooza!

MESA-Palooza! Flyer
MESA-Palooza! is a resource fair filled with food, music, and games! Come learn about the many cultural and justice-oriented student organizations and departments at U-M, while enjoying free gelato.
Join us for a Saturday of fun!

Please contact us for any accessibility needs.