America’s economic future: Penny Pritzker

Vandenberg Lecture, Policy Talks @ the Ford School

Free and open to the public. Penny Pritzker

This event will be live webstreamed. Please check event website just before the event for viewing information.

Join the conversation: #policytalks

Penny Pritzker will talk about America’s economic future, policies to enable the future of work, inclusive growth, innovation, and mobility, in conversation with Ellen Hughes-Cromwick, Senior Economist and Interim Associate Director of Social Science and Policy at the U-M Energy Institute.

About the speaker:
Penny Pritzker is the founder and Chairman of PSP Partners and its affiliate, Pritzker Realty Group. From June 2013 through January 2017, she served as U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the Obama Administration.

Ms. Pritzker is an entrepreneur, civic leader, and philanthropist, with more than twenty-five years of experience in numerous industries. Ms. Pritzker founded Vi Senior Living (formerly known as Classic Residence by Hyatt), and co-founded The Parking Spot and Artemis Real Estate Partners. Ms. Pritzker is the former chairman of the board of TransUnion and is a past board member of Hyatt Hotels Corporation, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, Marmon Group, and LaSalle Bank Corporation.

Ms. Pritzker is also a member of board of the Carnegie Endowment, a member of the Aspen Strategy Group and the Aspen Economic Strategy Group and on the advisory council of the Hamilton Project. Ms. Pritzker was also member of the board of the Council on Foreign Relations, the board of trustees of Stanford University, the Harvard University Board of Overseers and founded Skills for America’s Future. She also served on President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness and his Economic Recovery Advisory Board.

About the Vandenberg Lecture:The Meijer Family established the Vandenberg Fund to honor U.S. Senator Arthur Vandenberg, who served the State of Michigan in the U.S. Senate from 1928-1951. Senator Vandenberg forged bipartisan support for our country’s most significant and enduring foreign policies of the twentieth century, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, NATO and the creation of the United Nations.

 

Entrepreneurship Speaker Series

Clarence Wardell III, What Works Cities

Promo image of What Cities WorksThis weekly seminar series invites influential and disruptive entrepreneurially- minded leaders to share their personal experiences founding, financing and managing an emerging business venture. This event is FREE and open to the public as space permits.

Dr. Clarence Wardell III is currently the Director of Repurpose for Results at Results for America, supporting Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities Initiative. In that role he works with mid-size cities across the country to help them use data and evidence to guide their programming and investment decisions. He was most recently a member of the U.S. Digital Service at the Obama White House, where he led strategy and product management across several of the team’s projects, including those focused on criminal justice and human services. In that role he also co-led the White House Police Data Initiative, an effort aimed at using open data as a means to increase trust and engagement between law enforcement and the communities they serve. Prior to joining the U.S. Digital Service, Clarence served as a Presidential Innovation Fellow from 2014-2015. Clarence is a U-M alum and social entrepreneur who is passionate about using technology to increase and enhance civic engagement.

CWPS Faculty Lecture Series

Kelly Askew | Postsocialist Poetics: Articulations of Populist Politics in Tanzania

FLS flyer

Professor Askew presents the research findings for her current book project, exploring how Tanzanians and Zanzibaris musically and poetically respond to the changes that have taken place since the unraveling of socialism in the mid-1980s. With a focus on popularly produced poetry in Swahili-language newspapers or performed as Swahili rap, this talk explores how ordinary citizens interpret, enact and react to the fusing of socialist and neoliberal practices and ideologies in the United Republic of Tanzania.

The Center for World Performance Studies Faculty Lecture Series features our Faculty Fellows and visiting scholars and practitioners in the fields of ethnography and performance. Designed to create an informal and intimate setting for intellectual exchange among students, scholars, and the community, faculty are invited to present their work in an interactive and performative fashion.

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact Center for World Performance Studies, at 734-936-2777, at least one week in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the University to arrange.

Positive Links Speaker Series

Putting High Quality Connections into Practice

Jane Dutton and Monica C. Worline

Jane Dutton and Monica Worline
Tuesday, February 20, 2018
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Free and open to the public. Michigan Ross Campus
Ross Building
701 Tappan
Colloquium, 6th Floor
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1234

Register: http://myumi.ch/65Gxm

The Positive Links Speaker Series, presented by Michigan Ross’ Center for Positive Organizations, offers inspiring and practical research-based strategies for building organizations that are high performing and bring out the best in its people. Attendees learn from leading positive organizational scholars and connect with our community of academics, students, staff, and leaders.

Positive Links sessions take place at Michigan Ross, and are free and open to the public.

About the talk:
In this talk, Dutton and Worline invite you to consider the power of high quality connections in organizations as a source of competitive advantage. Research on the power of high quality connections (and the pathways to build them) offers insights into how we can infuse organizational practices (such as onboarding, meetings, talent development, and shift changes) with a greater capacity for building high quality connections. The presentation will offer practical examples of how to re-imagine everyday organizational routines as opportunities to build employee engagement, health, creativity, and resilience.

About Dutton:
Jane Dutton is the Robert L. Kahn Distinguished University Emerita Professor of Business Administration and Psychology at the University of Michigan and co-founder of the Center for Positive Organizations. Her research on Positive Organizational Scholarship began with an interest in compassion and the difference it makes for individuals and organizations, and has expanded to focus on the power of positive relationships at work, job crafting, and positive identities.

About Worline:
Monica C. Worline, PhD, is co-author of Awakening Compassion at Work and founder and CEO of EnlivenWork, an innovation organization that teaches people how to tap into courageous thinking, compassionate leadership, and the curiosity to bring their best work to life. She is a research scientist at Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education and an affiliate faculty at the Center for Positive Organizations, University of Michigan.

Host:
Gretchen Spreitzer, faculty director of the Center for Positive Organizations; Keith E. and Valerie J. Alessi Professor of Business Administration; Professor of Management and Organizations

Sponsors:
The Center for Positive Organizations thanks Sanger Leadership Center, Tauber Institute for Global Operations, Samuel Zell & Robert H. Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies, and Diane (BA ’73) and Paul (MBA ‘75) Jones for their support of the 2017-18 Positive Links Speaker Series.

A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America

Presented by the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, “A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America” is a symposium happening on February 16 and 17 at the University of Michigan Law School.

Over two days, we will examine five archetypal spaces in America: homes and neighborhoods, schools, courthouses, prisons, and borders. The symposium endeavors to consider the ways in which these spaces have become increasingly racialized, diagnose how that racialization impedes their basic functioning, and reimagine these spaces at their best, and our world as a more human dwelling place. James Baldwin gave us this name, embedded in his imperative “to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through vast forests, so that we will not, in all our doing, lose sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place.”

The symposium will bring together individuals working to better these spaces, hailing from many disciplines, including law, history, sociology, journalism, literature, architecture, urban planning, and visual art. Together, we hope to conceptualize forgotten or not yet dreamed of alternatives. Through discussions of projects already realized and ideas not yet concrete, we will collectively inch toward the world we wish to inhabit.

The symposium is free and open to the public. All are welcome.

Please register to attend at https://madeleine-jennings.squarespace.com/register/.

A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America

Presented by the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, “A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America” is a symposium happening on February 16 and 17 at the University of Michigan Law School.

Over two days, we will examine five archetypal spaces in America: homes and neighborhoods, schools, courthouses, prisons, and borders. The symposium endeavors to consider the ways in which these spaces have become increasingly racialized, diagnose how that racialization impedes their basic functioning, and reimagine these spaces at their best, and our world as a more human dwelling place. James Baldwin gave us this name, embedded in his imperative “to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through vast forests, so that we will not, in all our doing, lose sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place.”

The symposium will bring together individuals working to better these spaces, hailing from many disciplines, including law, history, sociology, journalism, literature, architecture, urban planning, and visual art. Together, we hope to conceptualize forgotten or not yet dreamed of alternatives. Through discussions of projects already realized and ideas not yet concrete, we will collectively inch toward the world we wish to inhabit.

The symposium is free and open to the public. All are welcome.

Please register to attend at https://madeleine-jennings.squarespace.com/register/.

CWPS Faculty Lecture Series

Damani Partridge | Four Years of Filming the Future: Berlin and Detroit

Faculty Lecture series flyer
Professor Partridge’s Filming Future Cities project uses film as a critical means to investigate urban futures and engage a broader public, building on his ongoing collaborative film projects in Detroit and Berlin: “Filming the Future of Detroit,’’ and “Filming the Future from Berlin: Noncitizen Perspectives,’’ begun in 2014 (see filmingfuturecities.org). The point of the project is not only to teach refugees, migrants, youth, and noncitizens the skills required for filmmaking, ethnography, and critical analysis of urban landscapes, but also to teach them how to distribute their work to a broader audience and to participate in the planning for and imagination of their city’s future. Using the project’s films as examples, this talk will think through the efficacy of using film as a technique for shaping the future.

The Center for World Performance Studies Faculty Lecture Series features our Faculty Fellows and visiting scholars and practitioners in the fields of ethnography and performance. Designed to create an informal and intimate setting for intellectual exchange among students, scholars, and the community, faculty are invited to present their work in an interactive and performative fashion.

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact Center for World Performance Studies, at 734-936-2777, at least one week in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the University to arrange.

Center for World Performance Studies | PERFORMANCE TALKS: adaptation

RR press photoRussian Renaissance
Russian Renaissance brings together tradition and modernity in unique crossover and fusion styles, employing the balalaika (a Russian stringed instrument with a unique triangular body), domra (a long-necked Russian string instrument from the lute family), button accordion, and contrabass balalaika. This quartet prides themselves on presenting high-calibre traditional folk music through a modern, vibrant, and enticing lens. For this talk, members of Russian Renaissance discuss working and collaborating within the large international chamber arts landscape.

UMS presents Russian Renaissance at Rackham Auditorium on Saturday, January 27 at 8:00pm.

For more information, contact cwps.information@umich.edu

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact Center for World Performance Studies, at 734-936-2777, at least one week in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the University to arrange.

Lost (and Found) in Translation: Perception and Expression across Borders and Languages

Multidisciplinary Panel

Event poster

In 1922, philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein declared that “the limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” With the globally-connected community at the University of Michigan in mind, we invite you to an exploration of the cross-cultural academic expressive production that accompanies thinking and writing from a non-English background. Taking the University of Michigan as a case study, we hope to engage questions of scholarship and public expression incubated in the globalized environment that is the contemporary American university. Rather than focusing on the mechanics of English as a Second Language or as a lingua franca, we seek a discussion around scholarly expression in a multicultural, globalized academia. How does an American academic culture of expression interact with the increasingly international body of authors on campus? And, what does it mean to think and write from a non-normative background? Please join us for a scholarly conversation on multilingualism and the pleasures and difficulties of translation.

Speakers:
Pär Cassel (History & International Relations)
Gottfried Hagen (Near Eastern Studies)
Se-Mi Oh (Asian Languages & Cultures)
Benjamin Paloff (Comparative & Slavic Literature)
Will Thomson (Anthropology & Architecture)

Hors d’oeuvres to be served