The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

Shoshana Zuboff - The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

Shoshana Zuboff - The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

Lecture, Book Sales and Signing

In her book The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, scholar and sociologist Shoshana Zuboff posits a detailed examination of the unprecedented power of surveillance capitalism, by which our personal information, monetized and exploited by big tech companies, is then used to predict and shape our behaviors. In this frank and necessarily lucid talk, Zuboff defines the terms of surveillance capitalism as a new economic system, pioneered at Google and later Facebook, in much the same way that mass-production and managerial capitalism were pioneered at Ford and General Motors a century before. Zuboff speaks urgently to our need to protect ourselves in this unprecedented age, and not try to resist or strike in the ways we did a century ago. Google, Amazon and now fallen behemoths like Cambridge-Analytica aren’t going anywhere, but as Zuboff expansively demonstrates, we can create countermeasures to stave off the monopolistic workings of these companies. We have the power to demand more from these seemingly all-powerful corporations. If they want what we provide (data), they in turn will have to change their usage tactics. The citizen desire and the leverage is here, Zuboff argues—and it’s in the companies’ best interests to change. Rather than facing the subject with worry or paranoia, Zuboff argues for us to pay attention, resist habituation, and come up with novel, innovative responses to the issue of surveillance capitalism, as novel a system as we are likely to know.

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Freshwater Stories: Optics, Governance, and Adaptation around the Great Lakes

Institute for the Humanities. Image is of the University of Michigan yellow block M and the word humanities in all caps.

Institute for the Humanities. Image is of the University of Michigan yellow block M and the word humanities in all caps.

Jill S. Harris Memorial Lecture/Humanities Week Keynote Lecture by Rachel Havrelock, founder and director, UIC Freshwater Lab

There is a plausible bright future for communities in the Great Lakes basin. Holding over 20% of the world’s fresh water, the much-maligned Rust Belt could transform into the Water Belt marked by innovation in agriculture and production and welcoming to waves of climate migrants. Yet no framework of regulation, governance, or funding currently exists to ensure such outcomes. Instead public subsidy of extractive and polluting corporations persists. Along with lax enforcement of regulation, there are no mechanisms to deal with agricultural runoff, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. How to get from here to the Water Belt?

Rachel Havrelock’s work shows how the necessary knowledge about water systems resides at the local level where community members struggle with particular forms of privatization, extraction, and pollution. Not only do stories about these contests over water illuminate global processes, but they also chart a course forward. Reflecting on stories she has collected across the Great Lakes basin, Havrelock will share prominent ideas about life around the remarkable freshwater seas.

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Michigan University-wide Sustainability and Environment (MUSE) Conference 2020

The purpose of the conference is to foster connections and new collaborations across the broad suite of sustainability and environment-related research at the University of Michigan. We welcome participation from those advancing knowledge through work in the humanities and the social, physical, natural, and engineering sciences.

Rethinking the University: On Discipline, Excellence, and Solidarity

We are excited to invite you to the Global Theories of Critique’s second event of the academic year, with our theme for this year being “On the Failed and Marginal,” focusing on the excluded and undermined from and in Euro-American histories. Challenging these histories or going against and beyond them demands an interrogation of the space from which we think, write, and act: the university and its various arms. Following this thinking, our second event will be a workshop on “Rethinking the University: On Discipline, Excellence, and Solidarity” with Professor Reginald Jackson, to be held on Thursday, Oct. 31st, 4-6 pm, room 1014 Tisch Hall, dinner included.

Professor Jackson is an Associate Professor of Pre-modern Japanese Literature at U of M’s department of Asian Languages and Cultures, and has been long committed to thinking and practicing knowledge production in relation to solidarity with the marginalized and forgotten, within both the university’s own space and its many outsides. As such, ahead of this event, we recommend reading Professor Jackson’s recently published article, titled “Solidarity’s Indiscipline: Regarding Miyoshi’s Pedagogical Legacy,” along with two theoretical pieces he is in engaging with. All readings are available here, and we recommend reading them in this order:

Readings, “The Idea of Excellence”
Jackson, “Solidarity’s Indiscipline: Regarding Miyoshi’s Pedagogical Legacy”
Moten and Harney, “The University and the Undercommons” (optional)

If you plan on attending this event, please RSVP here

Queer/Cuir/Feminist (Q/C/F) Américas Working Group Symposium

This is a public symposium of the Queer/Cuir/Feminist (Q/C/F) Group of the Americas to be held in Ann Arbor on September 20, 2019, to advance the publication of two scholarly journal special issues that will appear in the United States (in English) and in Brazil (in Spanish and Portuguese). We aspire to create a public space at the University of Michigan for the discussion of LGBTQ Latinx, Indigenous, and Afro- diasporic gender and sexuality through this one-day public event. Our interdisciplinary, transnational, action-based, Latinx queer feminist scholarly group includes university-based scholars and independent scholars and activists that are involved in diverse educational initiatives in several Latin American countries and U.S. Latinx communities. We will host a panel discussion, a keynote speaker, and a reception.

A/PIA Seminar: Gordon H Chang

Gordon H. Chang (Professor of American History, Stanford University)

Bio:
I am interested in two areas of American life that are often considered separately. The historical connections between race and ethnicity in America, on the one hand, and foreign relations, on the other are in fact profound. I explore these interconnections in my teaching and scholarship. My particular area of focus is trans-Pacific relations, the inter-connections between East Asia and America.I am interested in political, social, and cultural interactions from the earliest days of America to the present.My current research project concerns the recovery and interpretation of the experiences of Chinese railroad workers in North America. Please go to www.chineserailroadworkers.stanford.edu for more information.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Long Table Discussion: Art / Environment / Sustainability

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a three-day residency, June 27–30. Mattingly, whose photograph, Life of Objects, is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. The centerpiece of the residency is a large-scale public art project titled Objects in the Round, in the Annex tent at Top of the Park on Ingalls Mall where festivalgoers will build a miniature landscape with Mattingly that explores relationships with objects, built landscapes, and habits of consumption.   To kick off her residency, Mattingly will be joined by thought leaders from U-M and beyond—A2SF’s James Carter, UMMA curator Jennifer Friess, arts curator of the U-M Institute for the Humanities Amanda Krugliak, director of the Huron River Watershed Council Laura Rubin, Detroit-based interdisciplinary artist Sacramento Knoxx, independent film director and producer Diane Cheklich, and Christy Bieber, co-director of The Aadizookaan—for a discussion on the possibilities and challenges for artists and arts organizations creating and presenting artwork that explores sustainability and the environment. The Long Table format was born from director and scholar Lois Weaver’s exercise on participation and public engagement. Its aim is to foster civic-minded discussions on ideas and questions surrounding the city’s creative culture. It’s a dinner table atmosphere encouraging participants to ask questions, make statements, leave comments, or openly sit, listen, and watch.

For more information about additional programs for Mattingly’s residency and related to The World to Come exhibition, click here.

Mary Mattingly’s residency is presented in partnership with the Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s Festival Footprint Initiative established with generous support from  Toyota.


The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

The Punishment Continuum: How Court Actors Sentence and Enforce Monetary Sanctions

Professor Alexes Harris

Event flyerAt this ISR Reads Event, hosted by The Institute for Social Research and the School of Public Health Epidemiology, Professor Alexes Harris will discuss her book “Pound of Flesh: Monetary Sanction as a Punishment for the Poor” (2016 Russell Sage). 

The work examines the system of monetary sanctions (fines and fees), how decision-makers interpret the state law, apply the law to people before the court, and monitor their payments. Dr. Harris will also talk about her current five-year study examining the system of monetary sanctions across eight states and discuss policy implications. 

Alexes Harris is the Presidential Term Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Washington. 

A livestream of the event will be available: https://bluejeans.com/718378010

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event or have any questions, please contact Anna Massey at abeattie@umich.edu.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency.