Critical Conversations Graduate Panel: Sexual Modernities

sexual modernities

 Charles Deluvio on Unsplash
This panel, part of the graduate student Critical Conversations series, will feature graduate student papers on the topic of “Sexual Modernities,” anticipating the conference of the same name to be held at the University of Michigan on March 14-16, 2019. This panel will be held over lunch and is open to all members of the University of Michigan community.

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha Author Talk & Book Signing

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

Dr. Mona
Flint was already a troubled city in 2014 when the state of Michigan—in the name of austerity—shifted the source of its water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River. Soon after, citizens began complaining about the water that flowed from their taps—but officials rebuffed them, insisting that the water was fine. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician at the city’s public hospital, took state officials at their word and encouraged the parents and children in her care to continue drinking the water—after all, it was American tap water, blessed with the state’s seal of approval.

But a conversation at a cookout with an old friend, leaked documents from a rogue environmental inspector, and the activism of a concerned mother raised red flags about lead—a neurotoxin whose irreversible effects fall most heavily on children. Even as circumstantial evidence mounted and protests grew, Dr. Mona knew that the only thing that could stop the lead poisoning was undeniable proof—and that to get it, she’d have to enter the fight of her life.

What the Eyes Don’t See is the inspiring story of how Dr. Mona—accompanied by an idiosyncratic team of researchers, parents, friends, and community leaders—proved that Flint’s kids were exposed to lead and then fought her own government and a brutal backlash to expose that truth to the world. Paced like a scientific thriller, this book shows how misguided austerity policies, the withdrawal of democratic government, and callous bureaucratic indifference placed an entire city at risk. And at the center of the story is Dr. Mona herself—an immigrant, doctor, scientist, and mother whose family’s activist roots inspired her pursuit of justice.

Join Dr. Mona Hanna-Attish for a talk, Q&A, and book signing of What the Eyes Don’t See.

Literati Bookstore will be on-hand to sell copies of the book.

FRAME: A salon series on visual art, performance, and identity

Atrium Institute for the Humanities
202 S. Thayer St. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

UMS/Institute for the Humanities presents:

The U-M Institute for the Humanities and UMS will offer a series of open dialogues around contemporary visual art, performance, and identity.

Discussions will be hosted by Detroit-based performance artist and U-M alumna Jennifer Harge and by art critic, curator, and co-founder of ARTS.BLACK Taylor Renee Aldridge. Harge, Aldridge, and a panel of discussants will attend performances from the UMS season, as well as exhibitions at the U-M Institute for the Humanities. In open discussions, they will respond to the exhibitions and performances, exploring how visual art and performance can be used as a tool for disrupting, organizing, lamenting, and building counter-narrative in response to the status quo.

Considering the concept of diaspora and how it becomes a global container of cultural expression for groups that have been “othered,” FRAME will identify what transpires when the historically marginalized penetrate and occupy the center. Keeping in mind notions of identity and intersecting oppressions carried out through artmaking, FRAME will examine how artists push up against, question, hold accountable, or even dismantle the frame, ultimately creating new frame works for peripheral groups to occupy.

Presented in collaboration with Harge Dance Stories, ARTS. BLACK, U-M Institute for the Humanities, the U-M Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, and the Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs.

Is RSVP required? No

 

Event Contact Info

Adam DesJardins
(734)-615-4284
adamdesj@umich.edu
http://www.ums.org

Bending the Arc – The Rise of Social Enterprise and Mission based Businesses

 

Dr. Akhtar Badshah will discuss the rise of social enterprise and mission-based businesses and their impact on society. A new generation of funders are looking at new models of social investments; they also have a different approach to measuring social return on investments; they are utilizing technology extensively; and they view the role of public policy and scale with a new lens.  In his talk Dr. Badshah will cover these issues and provide innovative approaches that are bending the arc of humanity for good.

Dr. Badshah is a seasoned executive with over 30 years of experience in international development and philanthropy, managing Microsoft’s corporate philanthropic program and co-founding a global nonprofit for social enterprise, the Digital Partners Foundation.  He is currently the Chief Catalyst at Catalytic Innovators Group, distinguished visiting faculty at the University of Washington, and the curator of Accelerating Social Transformation and a co-author of Technology at the Margins: How IT Meets the Needs of Emerging Markets.

Breakfast served

FRAME: A salon series on visual art, performance, and identity

Atrium Institute for the Humanities
202 S. Thayer St. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

UMS/Institute for the Humanities presents:

The U-M Institute for the Humanities and UMS will offer a series of open dialogues around contemporary visual art, performance, and identity.

Discussions will be hosted by Detroit-based performance artist and U-M alumna Jennifer Harge and by art critic, curator, and co-founder of ARTS.BLACK Taylor Renee Aldridge. Harge, Aldridge, and a panel of discussants will attend performances from the UMS season, as well as exhibitions at the U-M Institute for the Humanities. In open discussions, they will respond to the exhibitions and performances, exploring how visual art and performance can be used as a tool for disrupting, organizing, lamenting, and building counter-narrative in response to the status quo.

Considering the concept of diaspora and how it becomes a global container of cultural expression for groups that have been “othered,” FRAME will identify what transpires when the historically marginalized penetrate and occupy the center. Keeping in mind notions of identity and intersecting oppressions carried out through artmaking, FRAME will examine how artists push up against, question, hold accountable, or even dismantle the frame, ultimately creating new frame works for peripheral groups to occupy.

Presented in collaboration with Harge Dance Stories, ARTS. BLACK, U-M Institute for the Humanities, the U-M Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, and the Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs.

Is RSVP required? No

Event Contact Info

Adam DesJardins
(734)-615-4284
adamdesj@umich.edu
http://www.ums.org