Anti-Racist Community Engagement (Students Only)

This interactive virtual workshop will interrogate the role white supremacy often plays in university community engagement experiences and will explore anti-racist approaches to our work in and with communities. The workshop is designed for students with prior knowledge or experience with community engagement who are interested in learning more about how to practice anti-racism in their engaged course, service, project, or research.

Workshop content will build on basic concepts of race, racism, social identity, power, and privilege. If you’re newer to those concepts and how they connect to community engagement, we encourage you to complete modules 1 and 2 of the Community Engagement: Collaborating for Change MOOC and/or attend our Entering, Engaging, and Exiting Communities workshop (see upcoming sessions on our homepage) before signing up for this offering. You may also want to read Tania Mitchell’s (2008) “Traditional vs. Critical Service-Learning” before attending.

Register for this Session Here

Inclusive Leadership

There is a lot of talk about “inclusive leadership,” but many are left asking: What is it? Why is it important? How can I do it? This workshop will address these questions by presenting research on the specific traits, elements, and styles of inclusive leaders. Participants will be able to reflect on and share their own experiences and times that they have witnessed others modeling inclusive leadership. We will discuss the benefits of inclusive leadership at the individual and organizational level. The presenter will also share resources and best practices on inclusive leadership frameworks.
Speaker: Deborah Willis (she/her/hers), Assistant Director, Professional and Academic Development, Rackham Graduate School
This workshop is designed for master’s students, doctoral students, and postdoctoral fellows. For faculty and staff, please contact RackhamEvents@umich.edu to see if we can accommodate your attendance.

We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/mn27z.

Two-Way Street to Safe Communities: Law Enforcement and Social Work

Interprofessional education involves the ability to work with other professionals, gaining an understanding of roles, developing relationships, and increasing effective communication to achieve goals that support community members. Social concerns about the safety of communities have led to a reimagining of the ways professionals work together to advance social justice. This workshop attempts to have initial exposure and preparation for collaboration between law enforcement and social work professionals.

Register here

Mentoring Across Differences

This workshop will address challenges that emerge in mentoring relationships related to the players’ social identities and their intersection. Through a variety of interactive activities and case studies, participants will be able to explore from a distance the way bias plays out in mentoring relationships, dive into closer practice to recognize their own bias from a mentor’s perspective, and develop strategies to interrupt various biases to ensure particular kinds of collaborations with members of their (future) teams. Participants will also be able to tap into personal knowledge and experiences as mentors or mentees and create the vision and practice of mentorship they would like to pursue in their particular fields and careers. The session’s main objective is to recognize the power of intentional mentorship within the inclusive leadership framework by enhancing participants’ skills and professional toolkits and their understanding of differences, thus, ultimately, achieving a higher level of comfort with both vulnerability and life-long growth when advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion.
Speaker: Luciana Nemtanu (she/her/hers), Associate Director, Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program
Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/r8EE2.
We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Restoration, Transformation, and Leadership: Centering Healing in the Actions We Take Towards Racial Equity

Are you interested in learning how you and/or your organization can make the shift toward healing-centered engagement? Are you interested looking for contemplative practices that can aid in your personal racial healing as you work toward racial equity in larger communities? This workshop will provide an opportunity for you to engage these questions and engage in critical self-reflection on one’s level of commitment, courage, and cultural intelligence. Attendees will be exposed to the concept of healing centered engagement and leadership as opposed to trauma-informed approaches as they consider what inclusive leadership means for them and how their own journey provides a critical entry point into collective efforts. This workshop will particularly benefit members of the BIPOC community, but is open to all.
Speaker: Kyra T. Shahid (she/her), Assistant Director, DEI Focus, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching

We want to ensure full and equitable participation in our events. If an accommodation would promote your full participation in this event, please follow the registration link to indicate your accommodation requirements. Please let us know as soon as possible in order to have adequate time, preferably one week, to arrange for your requested accommodations or an effective alternative.

Registration is required at https://myumi.ch/0Wmme.

20 Things Everyone Should Know about Slavery

Panelists will seek to generate a discussion about how historical knowledge might contribute solutions to the problems of contemporary expressions of human slavery and offer new pathways to democracy and freedom.

Among American historians, it is generally agreed that the historical study of chattel slavery covered about 250 years: from 1619 to 1865 in the United States and to 1888 in Brazil and the Americas. Yet slavery has not disappeared. Globally, an estimated 27–40 million persons are victims of involuntary servitude. What if these contemporary forms of human labor exploitation constitute a “Third Slavery”? Our roundtable seeks to generate a discussion about how historical knowledge might contribute solutions to the problems of contemporary expressions of human slavery and offer new pathways to democracy and freedom.

Introductions will be given by Dr. Earl Lewis, director of the Center for Social Solutions and the Thomas C. Holt Distinguished University Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, History, and Public Policy.

The roundtable discussion will be chaired by Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, the Oliver H. Radkey Regents Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. Panelists include:

Dr. David W. Blight, the Sterling Professor of History and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University;

Ambassador (ret.) Luis C.deBaca, a Senior Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University;

Professor Bridgette Carr, the associate dean for strategic initiatives at Michigan Law and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Positive Organizations at U-M’s Ross School of Business;

Genevieve LeBaron, Professor of Politics and Director of Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Sheffield;

James Alexander Robinson, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies with emphasis in Black Studies at the Metropolitan State University, and curator of the Third Slavery archive for the Center for Social Solutions.

Register here

LSA DEI Workshop: Allies at Work

This program has been modified to deliver in a remote setting and updated to include content directly related to the COVID-19 pandemic. For questions or requests for accommodation, please contact our Administrative Coordinator, Mikalia Dennis (mikaliad@umich.edu) as soon as possible.

In this session, participants will learn:

– The role of allies in creating inclusive environments and creating change
– The best practices for being an ally
– How to apply these best practices in a work environment
– To identify unique obstacles towards being an ally in a remote working environment
– To challenge their own practices to be more intentional and effective allies

You will benefit by:

– Raising self-awareness and initiating new actions
– Enhancing your professional and personal effectiveness on and off the job
– Positively influencing personal and organizational decisions
– Creating stronger and more positive work relationships with others

Audience:

This session is open to all LSA employees. External guests may request to join as space allows.

Register here

Broadening Your Outreach: Inclusive Marketing for Private Practice

Reaching under-served populations is a core value of social work. Marketing, networking, sharing professional identity and creating a social media presence are integral elements of a private practice that reaches a diverse client base. Understanding the mental health needs of your community and approaching the community in a safe, accessible and approachable manner is key to building a socially-just private practice. This webinar will explore different avenues of creating accessible marketing to reach clients and strategies for creating a clinical network to expand outreach and referrals.

Register here

LSA DEI Workshop: The Microaggression Session

Jessica Garcia, LSA DEI Manager will lead this program updated to include content directly related to the COVID-19 pandemic. For questions or requests for accommodation, please contact our Administrative Coordinator, Mikalia Dennis (mikaliad@umich.edu) as soon as possible.

Microaggressions are verbal, behavioral, or environmental slights. They can be overt, subtle or unintentional, and lead to significant consequences.

In this session, participants will:

– Learn about “microaggressions” and other concepts relevant to this topic
– Obtain an understanding of the social and psychological impacts of microaggressions
– Engage in activities and dialogue to unveil microaggressions within the workplace
– Validate experiences with microaggressions
– Identify and discuss techniques to combat microaggressions, as a bystander or as a recipient

Audience:

This session is open to all LSA employees. It is recommended that participants complete a course on Implicit Bias before taking this session. External guests may request to join as space allows.

Register here