Donia Human Rights Center Lecture. Rights Make Might: Global Human Rights and Minority Social Movements in Japan

Kiyoteru Tsutsui, Professor of Sociology, Director of the Donia Human Rights Center, and Director of the Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan

KiyoWhy have the three most salient minority groups in Japan – the politically dormant Ainu, the active but unsuccessful Koreans, and the former outcaste group of Burakumin – all expanded their activism since the late 1970s despite the unfavorable domestic political environment? My investigation into the history of the three groups finds an answer in the galvanizing effects of global human rights on local social movements. Drawing on interviews and archival data, I document the transformative impact of global human rights ideas and institutions on minority activists, which changed the prevalent understanding about their standing in Japanese society and propelled them to new international venues for political claim making. The global forces also changed the public perception and political calculus in Japan over time, catalyzing substantial gains for the minority movements. Having benefited from global human rights, all three groups repaid their debt by contributing to the consolidation and expansion of international human rights principles and instruments. The in-depth historical comparative analysis offers rare windows into local, micro-level impact of global human rights and contributes to our understanding of international norms and institutions, social movements, human rights, ethnoracial politics, and Japanese society. 

Kiyoteru Tsutsui is Professor of Sociology, Director of the Donia Human Rights Center, and Director of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research on globalization of human rights and its impact on local politics has appeared in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Social Problems, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and other social science journals. His book publications include “Rights Make Might: Global Human Rights and Minority Social Movements in Japan” (Oxford University Press 2018), and a co-edited volume (with Alwyn Lim) “Corporate Social Responsibility in a Globalizing World” (Cambridge University Press 2015). He has been a recipient of National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, National Science Foundation grants, the SSRC/CGP Abe Fellowship, Stanford Japan Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship, and other grants as well as awards from American Sociological Association sections on Global and Transnational Sociology (2010, 2013, 2019), Human Rights (2017, 2019), Asia and Asian America (2018, 2019), Collective Behavior and Social Movements (2018), and Political Sociology (2019). 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event: umichhumanrights@umich.edu. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

International Conference on Population, Poverty, and Inequality

This conference is organized by the Scientific Panel on Population, Poverty, and Inequality of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), in collaboration with the Population Studies Center in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. The conference will feature researchers from a wide range of countries presenting research analyzing the interaction of population with poverty and inequality in low-income and middle-income countries. Schedule is available on the conference web site.

In Conversation: The World to Come: Art in a Changing Climate

What role do artists play in visualizing the Anthropocene, our current epoch of rapid and often-destructive ecological change? Using photography, video, drawing, and sculpture, the forty-five international artists in The World to Come respond to the impact of climate change around the globe. Join UMMA Assistant Curator of Photography Jennifer Friess for a discussion about how the artists on view reimagine humanity’s relationships with each other and the environment in the world today and to come.  

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation  for  the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn,  Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group  of  environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment,  Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Healthcare Delivery in Emerging Markets Presentations

Join us as graduate student teams share in-country project summaries of their work with healthcare organizations in Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Peru, and Rwanda.

The graduate student presenters are enrolled in the International Business Immersion course which is designed to enhance the students global leadership capabilities, awareness of diverse business issues on the current international landscape, and on-the-ground experience in a specific country. This will be a great opportunity for you to learn more about this course, the students’ work and their experiences abroad.

Donia Human Rights Center Distinguished Lecture. Sexual Harassment: The Law, the Politics and the Movement

Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School and James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

speakerProfessor Catharine A. MacKinnon will address the politics and law of sexual harassment, focusing on its violation of equality rights, in light of the #MeToo movement, exploring those developments in light of the theory of her most recent book, “Butterfly Politics: Changing the World for Women.”

This event is co-sponsored by: Department of Sociology, Law School, and Women’s Studies Department.

Catharine A. MacKinnon is the Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at Michigan Law and the long-term James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She holds a BA from Smith College, a JD from Yale Law School, and a PhD in political science from Yale. She specializes in sex equality issues under international and domestic (including comparative, criminal, and constitutional) law. She pioneered the legal claim for sexual harassment and, with Andrea Dworkin, created ordinances recognizing pornography as a civil rights violation and the Swedish model for abolishing prostitution. The Supreme Court of Canada has largely accepted her approaches to equality, pornography, and hate speech, which have been influential internationally as well. Representing Bosnian women survivors of Serbian genocidal sexual atrocities, she won with co-counsel a damage award of $745 million in August 2000 in Kadic v. Karadzic under the Alien Tort Act, the first recognition of rape as an act of genocide. Among the schools at which she has taught are Yale, Stanford, Chicago, Harvard, Osgoode Hall (Toronto), Basel (Switzerland), Hebrew University (Jerusalem), and Columbia. She was awarded residential fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study, Stanford, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and the University of Cambridge. Professor MacKinnon’s scholarly books include the casebook Sex Equality (2001/2007), Are Women Human? (2006), Women’s Lives, Men’s Laws (2005), Only Words (1993), Toward a Feminist Theory of the State (1989), Feminism Unmodified (1987), and Sexual Harassment of Working Women (1979). She is widely published in journals, the popular press, and many languages. Professor MacKinnon practices and consults nationally and internationally and works regularly with Equality Now, an NGO promoting international sex equality rights for women, and the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women. Serving as the first special gender adviser to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (The Hague) from 2008 to 2012, she implemented her concept of “gender crime.” In 2014, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Association of American Law Schools Women’s Division and was elected to the American Law Institute. Studies document that Professor MacKinnon is among the most widely-cited legal scholars in the English language. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange. Please contact: umichhumanrights@umich.edu

CREES Noon Lecture. How the West Corrupts the East: Swedish Bribes and Uzbek Dictators

Fredrik Laurin, Knight-Wallace Fellow and special projects editor for Current Affairs, SVT (Swedish Television)

Fredrik LaurinWith a world record fine and the CEO now on trial in Sweden, Europe’s fifth largest telecommunications provider, Telia Company AB, is slowly getting out from an expensive and morally corrupt endeavor in Uzbekistan. Award-winning Swedish journalist and 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan Fredrik Laurin presents Swedish Public Service TV’s exposure of international corruption. The lecture will address the effects of corruption in Central Asia and the role of U.S. legislation as the only working law against corruption.

Fredrik Laurin is editor of special projects for Swedish Television’s (SVT’s) Current Affairs program. Before this he was editor of the investigative department for Swedish Radio, a reporter for SVT, and investigative reporter for National TV 4. Laurin’s investigations exposed tax havens and tax evasion by the global corporate elite and corruption in the Swedish government and abroad. One such investigation exposed how purportedly alliance-free Sweden secretly cooperates with U.S. authorities in eavesdropping, intelligence gathering, extraordinary rendition, and torture in the war on terror. He has received the Stora Journalistpriset, the Swedish equivalent to the Pulitzer Prize, and Guldspaden, the Swedish Investigative Reporters and Editors award. He has received several other awards for his work, including the Pulitzer Prize for his collaborative efforts on the Panama Papers with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Laurin graduated from the Gothenburg School of Journalism and studied political science at Gothenburg University. Currently he is a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

CREES Noon Lecture. “They Treat Us Like Animals Here”: Romani and Egyptian Belonging in Albania

Chelsi West Ohueri, postdoctoral fellow for population health, University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School

Chelsi West OhueriWhile many scholars in the Balkan region have analyzed identity and the politics of difference through the lens of ethnicity and ethnic conflict, few have done so through frameworks of racialization and racial belonging. Drawing from anthropological and ethnographic research with Romani and Egyptian communities in Albania, this talk features a critical discussion of social inequality with a particular focus on processes of racialization, dehumanization, and marginalization. In Albania, Roms and Egyptians are often racialized as dorë e zezë or ‘black’ while Albanians are racialized as dorë e bardhë or ‘white’. Additionally, many Roms and Egyptians in Albania frequently invoke the language of dehumanization to articulate their experiences with discrimination and non-belonging in Albania. Through an exploration of ethnographic cases, this talk will examine local constructions of these racial identities in the post-communist period, specifically as they pertain to housing segregation, health, labor, and the environment. This talk will also shed light on the ways that Roms and Egyptians in Albania mobilize around issues of inequality to promote social justice. 

Chelsi West Ohueri is a sociocultural anthropologist and postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Population Health at the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. Her research interests include race and racialization, belonging, marginalization, health disparities, and global health. She has conducted extensive ethnographic research in Albania, southeastern Europe, and Central Texas. West Ohueri is a native of Jackson, MS and completed her Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin in 2016. Her dissertation analyzed racialization and belonging in Romani, Egyptian, and Albanian communities of Albania. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to crees@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

Arab Heritage Month: Remembering the Refugees

Hosted by Epsilon Alpha Sigma Sorority, Inc.

Arab Heritage Month FlyerThis is a ticketed event. MESA will provide a limited number of free tickets on a first-come, first-serve basis. More information will become available.