Donia Human Rights Center Distinguished Lecture. Sexual Harassment: The Law, the Politics and the Movement

Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School and James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

speakerProfessor Catharine A. MacKinnon will address the politics and law of sexual harassment, focusing on its violation of equality rights, in light of the #MeToo movement, exploring those developments in light of the theory of her most recent book, “Butterfly Politics: Changing the World for Women.”

This event is co-sponsored by: Department of Sociology, Law School, and Women’s Studies Department.

Catharine A. MacKinnon is the Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at Michigan Law and the long-term James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She holds a BA from Smith College, a JD from Yale Law School, and a PhD in political science from Yale. She specializes in sex equality issues under international and domestic (including comparative, criminal, and constitutional) law. She pioneered the legal claim for sexual harassment and, with Andrea Dworkin, created ordinances recognizing pornography as a civil rights violation and the Swedish model for abolishing prostitution. The Supreme Court of Canada has largely accepted her approaches to equality, pornography, and hate speech, which have been influential internationally as well. Representing Bosnian women survivors of Serbian genocidal sexual atrocities, she won with co-counsel a damage award of $745 million in August 2000 in Kadic v. Karadzic under the Alien Tort Act, the first recognition of rape as an act of genocide. Among the schools at which she has taught are Yale, Stanford, Chicago, Harvard, Osgoode Hall (Toronto), Basel (Switzerland), Hebrew University (Jerusalem), and Columbia. She was awarded residential fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study, Stanford, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and the University of Cambridge. Professor MacKinnon’s scholarly books include the casebook Sex Equality (2001/2007), Are Women Human? (2006), Women’s Lives, Men’s Laws (2005), Only Words (1993), Toward a Feminist Theory of the State (1989), Feminism Unmodified (1987), and Sexual Harassment of Working Women (1979). She is widely published in journals, the popular press, and many languages. Professor MacKinnon practices and consults nationally and internationally and works regularly with Equality Now, an NGO promoting international sex equality rights for women, and the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women. Serving as the first special gender adviser to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (The Hague) from 2008 to 2012, she implemented her concept of “gender crime.” In 2014, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Association of American Law Schools Women’s Division and was elected to the American Law Institute. Studies document that Professor MacKinnon is among the most widely-cited legal scholars in the English language. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange. Please contact: umichhumanrights@umich.edu

CREES Noon Lecture. How the West Corrupts the East: Swedish Bribes and Uzbek Dictators

Fredrik Laurin, Knight-Wallace Fellow and special projects editor for Current Affairs, SVT (Swedish Television)

Fredrik LaurinWith a world record fine and the CEO now on trial in Sweden, Europe’s fifth largest telecommunications provider, Telia Company AB, is slowly getting out from an expensive and morally corrupt endeavor in Uzbekistan. Award-winning Swedish journalist and 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan Fredrik Laurin presents Swedish Public Service TV’s exposure of international corruption. The lecture will address the effects of corruption in Central Asia and the role of U.S. legislation as the only working law against corruption.

Fredrik Laurin is editor of special projects for Swedish Television’s (SVT’s) Current Affairs program. Before this he was editor of the investigative department for Swedish Radio, a reporter for SVT, and investigative reporter for National TV 4. Laurin’s investigations exposed tax havens and tax evasion by the global corporate elite and corruption in the Swedish government and abroad. One such investigation exposed how purportedly alliance-free Sweden secretly cooperates with U.S. authorities in eavesdropping, intelligence gathering, extraordinary rendition, and torture in the war on terror. He has received the Stora Journalistpriset, the Swedish equivalent to the Pulitzer Prize, and Guldspaden, the Swedish Investigative Reporters and Editors award. He has received several other awards for his work, including the Pulitzer Prize for his collaborative efforts on the Panama Papers with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Laurin graduated from the Gothenburg School of Journalism and studied political science at Gothenburg University. Currently he is a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to us at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

CREES Noon Lecture. “They Treat Us Like Animals Here”: Romani and Egyptian Belonging in Albania

Chelsi West Ohueri, postdoctoral fellow for population health, University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School

Chelsi West OhueriWhile many scholars in the Balkan region have analyzed identity and the politics of difference through the lens of ethnicity and ethnic conflict, few have done so through frameworks of racialization and racial belonging. Drawing from anthropological and ethnographic research with Romani and Egyptian communities in Albania, this talk features a critical discussion of social inequality with a particular focus on processes of racialization, dehumanization, and marginalization. In Albania, Roms and Egyptians are often racialized as dorë e zezë or ‘black’ while Albanians are racialized as dorë e bardhë or ‘white’. Additionally, many Roms and Egyptians in Albania frequently invoke the language of dehumanization to articulate their experiences with discrimination and non-belonging in Albania. Through an exploration of ethnographic cases, this talk will examine local constructions of these racial identities in the post-communist period, specifically as they pertain to housing segregation, health, labor, and the environment. This talk will also shed light on the ways that Roms and Egyptians in Albania mobilize around issues of inequality to promote social justice. 

Chelsi West Ohueri is a sociocultural anthropologist and postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Population Health at the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. Her research interests include race and racialization, belonging, marginalization, health disparities, and global health. She has conducted extensive ethnographic research in Albania, southeastern Europe, and Central Texas. West Ohueri is a native of Jackson, MS and completed her Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin in 2016. Her dissertation analyzed racialization and belonging in Romani, Egyptian, and Albanian communities of Albania. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to crees@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

Arab Heritage Month: Remembering the Refugees

Hosted by Epsilon Alpha Sigma Sorority, Inc.

Arab Heritage Month FlyerThis is a ticketed event. MESA will provide a limited number of free tickets on a first-come, first-serve basis. More information will become available.

ELPP Lecture Series: The Environment, Human Rights and Immunity at the World Bank

Professor David Hunter, American University Washington College of Law

Please join us for the latest installment of the Environmental Law and Policy Program Lecture Series, presented by Professor David Hunter from the American University Washington College of Law. Professor Hunter will discuss the global campaign to hold international financial Institutions like the World Bank accountable for the environmental damage and human rights violations caused by their projects. This will include the implications of Jam v. International Finance Corporation (IFC), a case pending before the US Supreme Court that challenges the World Bank’s claim of immunity. The case was brought by local fishermen in coastal India harmed by a coal-fired power plant. The case reflects one of several strategies for applying minimum environmental and human rights standards to the activities of international organizations. 

This event is free and open to the public. 

David Hunter is Professor of international and comparative environmental law at American University’s Washington College of Law. He currently serves on the Boards of Directors of Accountability Counsel, the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, and the Project on Government Oversight. He is a Member Scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform and a member of the Organization of American States’ Expert Group on Environmental Law, the InterAmerican Network for Environmental Law’s Advisory Board, and the Strategic Advisors Group for the International Finance Corporation’s Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman. He is co-author of International Environmental Law & Policy (5th ed.) and Climate Change Law (2nd ed.). His research interests include human rights and the environment, environmental standards and accountability mechanisms in international finance, and climate change litigation, law and policy.

 

Gender: New Works, New Questions- Branding Humanity: Competing Narratives of Rights, Violence, and Global Citizenship by Amal Hassan Fadlalla

Amal Hassan Fadlalla; Sandra Gunning; Victor Mendoza

Branding Humanity coverSpeakers: 
– Amal Hassan Fadlalla, Associate Professor, Women’s Studies, Anthropology, Afroamerican and African Studies
– Sandra Gunning, Professor, Afroamerican and African Studies, and American Culture; 
– Victor Mendoza, Associate Professor, English and Women’s Studies; Faculty Associate, Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies Program, and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies

The Save Darfur movement gained an international following, garnering widespread international attention to this remote Sudanese territory. Celebrities and other notable public figures participated in human rights campaigns to combat violence in the region. But how do local activists and those throughout the Sudanese diaspora in the United States situate their own notions of rights, nationalism, and identity?

Based on interviews with Sudanese social actors, activists, and their allies in the United States, the Sudan, and online, Branding Humanity (Stanford Press, 2018) traces the global story of violence and the remaking of Sudan identities. Amal Hassan Fadlalla asks readers to consider how national and transnational debates about violence circulate, shape, and re-territorialize ethnic identities, disrupt meanings of national belonging, and rearticulate notions of solidarity and global affiliations.

This event is part of IRWG’s Gender: New Works, New Questions series, which spotlights recent publications by U-M faculty members and allows for deeper discussion by an interdisciplinary panel.

WCED Panel: What’s Up with Authoritarian Elections?

Authoritarian ElectionsPresenters: Erica Frantz, Masaaki Higashijima, Carl Henrik Knutsen, Alberto Simpser;  Moderator: Allen Hicken

Erica Frantz is an assistant professor of political science at Michigan State University. She specializes in authoritarian politics, democratization, conflict, and development. She has published six books on dictatorships and development, the most recent of which is “Authoritarianism: What Everyone Needs to Know” (Oxford University Press). 

Allen Hicken is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan. He studies political institutions and political economy in developing countries with a primary focus on political parties and party systems in developing democracies and their role in policy making. His regional specialty is Southeast Asia where he has worked in Thailand, the Philippines, and Cambodia. He is the author of “Building Party Systems in Developing Democracies,” published by Cambridge University Press in 2009. 

Masaaki Higashijima is an associate professor of political science at Tohoku University, Japan and a visiting research scholar in the Center for Political Studies at the University of Michigan. Before arriving in Tohoku, he was a Post-Doctoral Max Weber Fellow at European University Institute and an assistant professor at Waseda University in Tokyo. His research interests include comparative political economy, autocratic politics, democratization, civil conflict, ethnic politics and Central Asia. His articles related to these topics appeared in “British Journal of Political Science,” the “Journal of Politics, Political Behavior, Studies in Comparative International Development,” and “World Development.” 

Carl Henrik Knutsen is a professor of political science at the University of Oslo (UiO) and Research Group Leader for the Comparative Institutions and Regimes (CIR) group at the same department. He also holds a secondary position as Senior Researcher at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), is co-PI of Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem), and is a member of the Norwegian Young Academy. He defended his PhD, “The Economic Effects of Democracy and Dictatorship,” at the University of Oslo in 2011. Knutsen’s research concerns, for example, the economic effects of political institutions, democracy measurement, and the determinants of autocratic breakdown and democratization. 

Alberto Simpser is an associate professor of political science at ITAM in Mexico City. He is the author of “Why Governments and Parties Manipulate Elections” (Cambridge University Press 2013), coeditor (with Tom Ginsburg) of “Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes” (Cambridge University Press 2014), and has published articles in the “American Journal of Political Science,” “Journal of Politics,” “Public Opinion Quarterly,” “Latin American Research Review,” and “Annual Review of Political Science,” among others. He has a PhD in political science from Stanford University. His research interests include the political economy of development, democracy, election fraud, corruption, political culture, and political methodology. Prior to joining ITAM in 2014 he served on the faculty of the University of Chicago’s political science department as assistant professor. 

Organized by the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies with support from the Center for Political Studies (U-M) and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to weisercenter@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

CREES Noon Lecture. The Worlding of Eastern Europe: Architects from Socialist Countries in Cold War West Africa

Łukasz Stanek, visiting associate professor of architecture, U-M

This talk revisits one of the most under-researched topics in the history of 20th century modern architecture: African and Asian engagements of architects, planners, and construction companies from socialist countries. Upon their arrival to postcolonial Ghana and Nigeria, architects from socialist Hungary, Poland, and Yugoslavia drew analogies between the historical experience of Eastern Europe and West Africa as underdeveloped, colonized, and peripheral. This talk will show how these analogies allowed them to draw upon specific design tools and procedures from Eastern European architectural culture—and how their work in West Africa testified to the limits of these correspondences. 

Łukasz Stanek is a visiting associate professor of architecture at U-M, and senior lecturer at the Manchester School of Architecture, the University of Manchester, U.K. Stanek authored “Henri Lefebvre on Space: Architecture, Urban Research, and the Production of Theory” (2011) and edited Lefebvre’s book “Toward an Architecture of Enjoyment” (2014). He published on cold war mobilities of architecture between socialist countries, West Africa, and the Middle East, which is the topic of his forthcoming book. Previously Stanek taught at ETH Zurich and Harvard University, and received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in Visual Arts (Washington D. C.), among other institutions. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to crees@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

WCED Lecture: Judicial Politics in Africa

Shen-BayhFiona Shen-Bayh, WCED postdoctoral fellow, U-M

Existing research in comparative politics has focused on the legislative, bureaucratic, and coercive tools of autocratic survival, but judicial institutions remain comparatively understudied. In fact, courts are more often portrayed as safeguards against dictatorship rather than as enablers of arbitrary rule. This project takes a different approach by looking at the role courts play in autocratic survival and state repression. It specifically examines how the type of threat affects when and how autocrats use judicial procedures. Using cases from sub-Saharan Africa, Shen-Bayh analyzes the repressive logic of political trials, how judicial institutions are designed to facilitate these outcomes, and how patterns of judicial repression can become institutionalized over time. These findings contribute to our understanding of the judicial dimensions of autocratic survival.

Fiona Shen-Bayh is a WCED Postdoctoral Fellow (2018-20). Her current research looks at the role judicial and extrajudicial strategies of repression play in autocratic survival. She specifically examines how autocrats weaponize courts to eliminate political rivals and the effects of such practices on post-autocratic rule of law. Drawing on the experiences of sub-Saharan African countries in the postcolonial period, her findings show that repression methods often vary according to the source of the threat, which has important ramifications for how arbitrary rule is legitimized. By highlighting the repressive character of courts, this research deepens our understanding of how autocrats establish law and order and defuse threats to power. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to weisercenter@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.

Kerning Cultures: A Podcast Listening Party

Bella Ibrahim, Marketing Lead at Kerning Cultures

Kerning Cultures
Media surrounding the Middle East does not speak for its youth. And youth make up 65% of the region’s population. That’s 140M people between the ages of 15-35 who are largely rejecting the traditional media of their parents’ generation because of its political nature. 

Kerning Cultures is the premier Middle East podcast network, quoted by The Guardian as “This American Life for the Middle East.” Kerning Cultures is partnering with the University of Michigan to give Middle Eastern-American students & allies the opportunity to share their experiences, learn about the current state of Middle Eastern media representation, and how they can make an impact. 

On Tuesday, February 12th, 2019, The University of Michigan Global Islamic Studies Center will be hosting a Kerning Cultures listening party in 1010 Weiser Hall. We will listen to a Kerning Cultures episode and discuss it into the night with their Marketing Lead, Bella Ibrahim. 

The event is free and open to the public, RSVP at http://myumi.ch/J9DzE. Light refreshments will be provided. 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to attend this event, please reach out to islamicstudies@umich.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of this event. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.