UMMA Book Club: Art, Ideas, & Politics

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s. Surrounded by the large-scale artworks by Sam Gilliam, Helen Frankenthaler, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power (Jan 10), Art on My Mind, Visual Politics by bell hooks (March 14), Ninth Street Women by Mary Gabriel (May 9), Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner (July 11), and How We Get Free, edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12).

Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Wandering Song, an anthology of the Central American diaspora.

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Exhibition Endowment Donors:  Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund

University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

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The Eco Book Club and The World to Come

​Literati’s Eco Book Club goes on the road. Join us at UMMA on the occasion of the Museum’s exhibition of The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene. This thought-provoking exhibition grapples with the negative impact of human activity on the planet through the art of more than thirty-five international artists such as Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth. Discussions will be led by Literati’s Eco Book Club facilitator Alison Swan.

Alison Swan’s poems and essays have appeared in many places, including her poetry chapbooks Before the Snow Moon and Dog Heart, and the recent award-winning anthologies Elemental: A Collection of Michigan Creative Nonfiction, Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology, and Here: Women Writing on the Upper Peninsula. Her anthology Fresh Water: Women Writing on the Great Lakes is a Michigan Notable Book. A Mesa Refuge alum and a Petoskey Prize for Grassroots Environmental Leadership co-winner, she teaches literature and writing at the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at Western Michigan University and lives in Ann Arbor.

Sunday, June 2, 3 p.m. Great Tide Rising: Towards Clarity and Moral Courage in a Time of Planetary Change by Kathleen Dean Moore. Join UMMA’s award-winning docents for a tour of The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene at 2 p.m.

Sunday, July 28, 3 p.m. Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Preceding the Book Club, join curator Jennifer Friess and Education Outreach Program Coordinator Grace VanderVliet at 2 p.m. for “Cross Pollination,” a tour of the environmental themes in three exhibitions at UMMA: The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene; The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq​; and​ Jason DeMarte: Garden of Artificial Delights.

Participants are welcome to join us for one or both of the Book Club meetings. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

UMMA Book Club: Art, Ideas, & Politics

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s. Surrounded by the large-scale artworks by Sam Gilliam, Helen Frankenthaler, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power (Jan 10), Art on My Mind, Visual Politics by bell hooks (March 14), Ninth Street Women by Mary Gabriel (May 9), Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner (July 11), and How We Get Free, edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12).

Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Wandering Song, an anthology of the Central American diaspora.

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Exhibition Endowment Donors:  Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund

University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

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The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

Long Table Discussion: Art / Environment / Sustainability

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a three-day residency, June 27–30. Mattingly, whose photograph, Life of Objects, is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. The centerpiece of the residency is a large-scale public art project titled Objects in the Round, in the Annex tent at Top of the Park on Ingalls Mall where festivalgoers will build a miniature landscape with Mattingly that explores relationships with objects, built landscapes, and habits of consumption.   To kick off her residency, Mattingly will be joined by thought leaders from U-M and beyond—A2SF’s James Carter, UMMA curator Jennifer Friess, arts curator of the U-M Institute for the Humanities Amanda Krugliak, director of the Huron River Watershed Council Laura Rubin, Detroit-based interdisciplinary artist Sacramento Knoxx, independent film director and producer Diane Cheklich, and Christy Bieber, co-director of The Aadizookaan—for a discussion on the possibilities and challenges for artists and arts organizations creating and presenting artwork that explores sustainability and the environment. The Long Table format was born from director and scholar Lois Weaver’s exercise on participation and public engagement. Its aim is to foster civic-minded discussions on ideas and questions surrounding the city’s creative culture. It’s a dinner table atmosphere encouraging participants to ask questions, make statements, leave comments, or openly sit, listen, and watch.

For more information about additional programs for Mattingly’s residency and related to The World to Come exhibition, click here.

Mary Mattingly’s residency is presented in partnership with the Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s Festival Footprint Initiative established with generous support from  Toyota.


The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

The World to Come & Food: Feeding the World

Join Lilly Fink Shapiro, Program Manager of the U-M Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, and Michigan Farmer of the Year, Jerry Ann Hebron of Detroit’s Oakland Avenue Farm for a discussion about food waste, farm labor, and the politics of seeds. UMMA Assistant Curator of Photography Jennifer Friess will frame the discussion in the context of works in the exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, which explores the negative impact of human activity on the planet. This program is the second of a two-part series focusing on food sustainability, access, and justice.  The second program, “Feed Lots and our Industrialized Food System” takes place on July 14. 

Refreshments will be served in the new UMMA Cafe following the program.  

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability. 

UMMA Book Club: Art, Ideas, & Politics

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s. Surrounded by the large-scale artworks by Sam Gilliam, Helen Frankenthaler, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power (Jan 10), Art on My Mind, Visual Politics by bell hooks (March 14), Ninth Street Women by Mary Gabriel (May 9), Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner (July 11), and How We Get Free, edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12).

Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Wandering Song, an anthology of the Central American diaspora.

The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Exhibition Endowment Donors:  Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund

University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

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In Conversation: The World to Come: Art in a Changing Climate

What role do artists play in visualizing the Anthropocene, our current epoch of rapid and often-destructive ecological change? Using photography, video, drawing, and sculpture, the forty-five international artists in The World to Come respond to the impact of climate change around the globe. Join UMMA Assistant Curator of Photography Jennifer Friess for a discussion about how the artists on view reimagine humanity’s relationships with each other and the environment in the world today and to come.  

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation  for  the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda  McGurn,  Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group  of  environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment,  Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability.

The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

https://umma.umich.edu/sites/default/files/Harn-sixpetritsch_spatialintervention.jpegThe World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.  

Artist Residency with Mary Mattingly in conjunction with The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene

UMMA and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival welcome artist Mary Mattingly to Ann Arbor for a 3-day residency, June 27–June 30. Mattingly, whose photograph Life of Objects (pictured to the right) is featured in UMMA’s exhibition The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Antrhopocene, is deeply concerned with our relationships to objects—where they come from, where they go, their implications for humans, and their impact on the environment. Join the artist for a variety of interactive workshops and discussion-based programs during her residency. 

The Age of the Internet in Comic Books: Book Club Tour

On the occasion of the exhibition Art in the Age of the Internet, UMMA and Vault of Midnight-Ann Arbor have partnered up to form the UMMA Book Club: The Age of the Internet in Comic Books. Join David Choberka, Andrew W. Mellon Manager of Academic Outreach & Teaching, for a discussion in the gallery that connects the art on view to  themes in the selected comics. Open to anyone, regardless of participation in the book club.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors:
Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors:
William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga  

University of Michigan Funding Partners:
School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

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