Art in the Age of the Internet: 1989 to Today: Juliana Huxtable

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The iconic Juliana Huxtable is an American artist, writer, performer, and musician. Exploring the intersections of race, gender, queerness, technology and identity, Huxtable uses a diverse set of means to engage these issues, including self-portraiture, text-based prints, performance, nightlife, music, writing, and social media. Huxtable does not privilege any method over another, and the lines between different forms of her work are often fluid. This approach aids Huxtable in her ongoing critiques of existing social norms and categorical distinctions while indicating alternate, more hopeful possibilities. Huxtable references her own body and history as a transgender African American woman as she challenges the socio-political and cultural forces that inform normative conceptions of gender and sexuality. Huxtable’s Art and Performance work has been featured at Roskilde Festival, Denmark (2018), ReWire Festival, Netherlands (2018), Park Avenue Armory, New York (2018), Reena Spauldings, Solo show, New York (2017), Project Native Informant, London UK, (2017) MoMA PS1, New York (2014); “Take Ecstasy with Me,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Frieze Projects, London (2014); and 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2015); among other venues. She lives and works in New York, where she is the founder and DJ for Shock Value. And part of House of Ladosha a nightlife collective run by artists, DJs, writers, and fashion icons.​

Huxtable’s work is included in Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art from December 15, 2018 to April 7, 2019. Organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the exhibition examines the radical impact of internet culture on visual art since the invention of the web in 1989. This exhibition presents more than forty works across a variety of media—painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects. It features work by some of the most important artists working today, including Judith Barry, Juliana Huxtable, Pierre Huyghe, Josh Kline, Laura Owens, Trevor Paglen, Seth Price, Cindy Sherman, Frances Stark, and Martine Syms.

Major funding for Ms. Huxtable’s residency was provided by The Faculty Alliance for Diversity at the University of Michigan School of Social Work.

Michigan Social Work gratefully acknowledges for their support, the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series, the University of Michigan Museum of Art, The Institute for Research on Woman and Gender, and The Spectrum Center.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors:
Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors:
William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga  

University of Michigan Funding Partners:
School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

Photo: © Juri-Hiensch.

Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s

Sam Gilliam, Situation VI—Pisces 4, ca. 1972, polypropylene painted multiform. Williams College Museum of Art Museum purchase, Otis Family Acquisition Trust and Kathryn Hurd Fund. Courtesy of Joseph Goddu Fine Arts, Inc., New York. © Sam Gilliam

Exhibition: November 20, 2018 – September 29, 2019

See available dates and times

Can abstract art be about politics? In the early 1970s, that question was hotly debated as artists, critics, and the public grappled with the relationship between art, politics, race, and feminism. Many of those debates centered on bringing to light the roles that gender and race played in how “great modern art” was defined and assessed, and on employing art to advance civil rights. Within this discourse, abstraction had an especially fraught role. To many, the decision by women artists and artists of color to make abstract art seemed to represent a retreat from politics and protest: an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism. “Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s” presents large-scale work by four leading American artists—Helen Frankenthaler, Sam Gilliam, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson—who chose abstraction as a means of expression within the intense political climate of the early 1970s.

Lead support for “Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s” is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Additional generous support is provided by the Robert and Janet Miller Fund and the University of Michigan Department of Political Science.

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Beyond Borders: Global Africa

Seydou Keïta, Untitled, 1956-57, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC), Collection Jean Pigozzi, Geneva, Inv# MA/KE.046.D, © Seydou Keïta / SKPEAC

More than ever in the era of globalization, ideas traverse geographic, generational, and cultural boundaries, even as national borders seem to be closing. ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ reflects on this moment by considering how Africa and its artists have been at the center of complex histories of encounter and exchange for centuries. Bringing together a dazzling array of works made in Africa, Europe, and the United States from the nineteenth to twenty-first century, the exhibition demonstrates the international scope and reach of art from Africa and the African diaspora. It also explores issues such as slavery, colonization, migration, racism, and identity at play in the objects and their histories. Highlights include paintings, photographs, sculpture, and installations by Kudzanai Chiurai, Omar Victor Diop, Wangechi Mutu, and Serge Alain Nitegeka. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully-illustrated publication, the tenth in the UMMA Books series.

Lead support for ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan Office of Research, African Studies Center, and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Susan Ullrich.

Beyond Borders: Global Africa

Tuesday-Sunday, November 6-November 25, 2018

Seydou Keïta, Untitled, 1956-57, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC), Collection Jean Pigozzi, Geneva, Inv# MA/KE.046.D, © Seydou Keïta / SKPEACMore than ever in the era of globalization, ideas traverse geographic, generational, and cultural boundaries, even as national borders seem to be closing. ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ reflects on this moment by considering how Africa and its artists have been at the center of complex histories of encounter and exchange for centuries. Bringing together a dazzling array of works made in Africa, Europe, and the United States from the nineteenth to twenty-first century, the exhibition demonstrates the international scope and reach of art from Africa and the African diaspora. It also explores issues such as slavery, colonization, migration, racism, and identity at play in the objects and their histories. Highlights include paintings, photographs, sculpture, and installations by Kudzanai Chiurai, Omar Victor Diop, Wangechi Mutu, and Serge Alain Nitegeka. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully-illustrated publication, the tenth in the UMMA Books series.

Lead support for ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan Office of Research, African Studies Center, and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Susan Ullrich.

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Beyond Borders: Global Africa

Seydou Keïta, Untitled, 1956-57, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC), Collection Jean Pigozzi, Geneva, Inv# MA/KE.046.D, © Seydou Keïta / SKPEAC
Tuesday-Sunday, November 6-November 25, 2018

More than ever in the era of globalization, ideas traverse geographic, generational, and cultural boundaries, even as national borders seem to be closing. ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ reflects on this moment by considering how Africa and its artists have been at the center of complex histories of encounter and exchange for centuries. Bringing together a dazzling array of works made in Africa, Europe, and the United States from the nineteenth to twenty-first century, the exhibition demonstrates the international scope and reach of art from Africa and the African diaspora. It also explores issues such as slavery, colonization, migration, racism, and identity at play in the objects and their histories. Highlights include paintings, photographs, sculpture, and installations by Kudzanai Chiurai, Omar Victor Diop, Wangechi Mutu, and Serge Alain Nitegeka. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully-illustrated publication, the tenth in the UMMA Books series.

Lead support for ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan Office of Research, African Studies Center, and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Susan Ullrich.

Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice: the Case of the Jim Crow Museum

Dr. David Pilgrim, Founding Director of the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia and Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, Ferris State University

Dr. David PilgrimDr. David Pilgrim, the founder and current director of The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, will discuss the origins of this museum, its segregation era artifacts, and its mission to use these objects of intolerance to teach tolerance.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Student Life

Details here: http://ummsp.rackham.umich.edu/event/using-racist-memorabilia-to-teach-tolerance-and-promote-social-justice/

Guided Tour – Beyond Borders: Global Africa

Seydou Keïta, Untitled, 1956-57, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC), Collection Jean Pigozzi, Geneva, Inv# MA/KE.046.D, © Seydou Keïta / SKPEACMore than ever in the era of globalization, ideas traverse geographic, generational, and cultural boundaries, even as national borders seem to be closing. ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ reflects on this moment by considering how Africa and its artists have been at the center of complex histories of encounter and exchange for centuries. Bringing together a dazzling array of works made in Africa, Europe and the United States from the nineteenth to twenty-first century, the exhibition demonstrates the international scope and reach of art from Africa and the African diaspora. Join UMMA docents as they explore the significant themes of our times including slavery, colonization, migration, racism and identity.

Lead support for ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the University of Michigan Office of Research, African Studies Center, and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Susan Ullrich.

2018 Robert F. Berkhofer Jr. Lecture: An Evening With Gerald Vizenor

Gerald Vizenor

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The Berkhofer Lecture series (named for a former U-M professor and founder of the field of Native American studies) was established in 2014 by an alumni gift from the Dan and Carmen Brenner family of Seattle, Washington. In close consultation with the Brenners, Native American Studies decided to create a public lecture series featuring prominent, marquee speakers who would draw audiences from different communities (faculty and students, Ann Arbor and Detroit, and Michigan tribal communities as well as writers and readers of all persuasions). Native American students at U-M have consistently expressed their desire to make Native Americans more visible both on campus and off, and we believe that this lecture takes a meaningful step in that direction. Additionally, because of the statewide publicity it generates, we think it is already becoming another recruitment incentive for Native American students. It goes without saying that the speakers we are inviting provide tremendous value to the mission and work of Native American Studies at U-M.

Native American Studies at the University of Michigan presents the 2018 Robert F. Berkhofer Jr. Lecture: An Evening With Gerald Vizenor
BETRAYAL AND IRONY: Native American Survivance and the Subversion of Ethnology

Gerald Vizenor is Professor Emeritus of American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a citizen of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, and has published more than thirty books, novels, critical literary and cultural studies, and poetry. Blue Ravens, a historical novel, and Treaty Shirts are his most recent publications. Vizenor has received many awards including the American Book Award for Griever: An American Monkey King in China, the Western Literature Association Distinguished Achievement Award, and the Lifetime Literary Achievement Award from the Native Writer’s Circle of the Americas. Prior to his long career as an intellectual and academic, he enlisted in the U.S. Armed Forces, during which he was stationed in Japan; directed the American Indian Employment and Guidance Center in Minneapolis; and served as a journalist for the Minneapolis Tribune, where he reported critically about the activities of the American Indian Movement.

This event is free and open to the public. There will be a catered reception to follow the lecture.